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git/t/test-lib-functions.sh

1980 lines
45 KiB

# Library of functions shared by all tests scripts, included by
# test-lib.sh.
#
# Copyright (c) 2005 Junio C Hamano
#
# This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation, either version 2 of the License, or
# (at your option) any later version.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program. If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/ .
# The semantics of the editor variables are that of invoking
# sh -c "$EDITOR \"$@\"" files ...
#
# If our trash directory contains shell metacharacters, they will be
# interpreted if we just set $EDITOR directly, so do a little dance with
# environment variables to work around this.
#
# In particular, quoting isn't enough, as the path may contain the same quote
# that we're using.
test_set_editor () {
FAKE_EDITOR="$1"
export FAKE_EDITOR
EDITOR='"$FAKE_EDITOR"'
export EDITOR
}
test_decode_color () {
awk '
function name(n) {
if (n == 0) return "RESET";
if (n == 1) return "BOLD";
if (n == 2) return "FAINT";
if (n == 3) return "ITALIC";
if (n == 7) return "REVERSE";
if (n == 30) return "BLACK";
if (n == 31) return "RED";
if (n == 32) return "GREEN";
if (n == 33) return "YELLOW";
if (n == 34) return "BLUE";
if (n == 35) return "MAGENTA";
if (n == 36) return "CYAN";
if (n == 37) return "WHITE";
if (n == 40) return "BLACK";
if (n == 41) return "BRED";
if (n == 42) return "BGREEN";
if (n == 43) return "BYELLOW";
if (n == 44) return "BBLUE";
if (n == 45) return "BMAGENTA";
if (n == 46) return "BCYAN";
if (n == 47) return "BWHITE";
}
{
while (match($0, /\033\[[0-9;]*m/) != 0) {
printf "%s<", substr($0, 1, RSTART-1);
codes = substr($0, RSTART+2, RLENGTH-3);
if (length(codes) == 0)
printf "%s", name(0)
else {
n = split(codes, ary, ";");
sep = "";
for (i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
printf "%s%s", sep, name(ary[i]);
sep = ";"
}
}
printf ">";
$0 = substr($0, RSTART + RLENGTH, length($0) - RSTART - RLENGTH + 1);
}
print
}
'
}
lf_to_nul () {
perl -pe 'y/\012/\000/'
}
nul_to_q () {
perl -pe 'y/\000/Q/'
}
q_to_nul () {
perl -pe 'y/Q/\000/'
}
q_to_cr () {
tr Q '\015'
}
q_to_tab () {
tr Q '\011'
}
qz_to_tab_space () {
tr QZ '\011\040'
}
append_cr () {
sed -e 's/$/Q/' | tr Q '\015'
}
remove_cr () {
tr '\015' Q | sed -e 's/Q$//'
}
# In some bourne shell implementations, the "unset" builtin returns
# nonzero status when a variable to be unset was not set in the first
# place.
#
# Use sane_unset when that should not be considered an error.
sane_unset () {
unset "$@"
return 0
}
test_tick () {
if test -z "${test_tick+set}"
then
test_tick=1112911993
else
test_tick=$(($test_tick + 60))
fi
GIT_COMMITTER_DATE="$test_tick -0700"
GIT_AUTHOR_DATE="$test_tick -0700"
export GIT_COMMITTER_DATE GIT_AUTHOR_DATE
}
# Stop execution and start a shell. This is useful for debugging tests.
#
# Be sure to remove all invocations of this command before submitting.
# WARNING: the shell invoked by this helper does not have the same environment
# as the one running the tests (shell variables and functions are not
# available, and the options below further modify the environment). As such,
# commands copied from a test script might behave differently than when
# running the test.
#
# Usage: test_pause [options]
# -t
# Use your original TERM instead of test-lib.sh's "dumb".
# This usually restores color output in the invoked shell.
# -s
# Invoke $SHELL instead of $TEST_SHELL_PATH.
# -h
# Use your original HOME instead of test-lib.sh's "$TRASH_DIRECTORY".
# This allows you to use your regular shell environment and Git aliases.
# CAUTION: running commands copied from a test script into the paused shell
# might result in files in your HOME being overwritten.
# -a
# Shortcut for -t -s -h
test_pause () {
PAUSE_TERM=$TERM &&
PAUSE_SHELL=$TEST_SHELL_PATH &&
PAUSE_HOME=$HOME &&
while test $# != 0
do
case "$1" in
-t)
PAUSE_TERM="$USER_TERM"
;;
-s)
PAUSE_SHELL="$SHELL"
;;
-h)
PAUSE_HOME="$USER_HOME"
;;
-a)
PAUSE_TERM="$USER_TERM"
PAUSE_SHELL="$SHELL"
PAUSE_HOME="$USER_HOME"
;;
*)
break
;;
esac
shift
done &&
TERM="$PAUSE_TERM" HOME="$PAUSE_HOME" "$PAUSE_SHELL" <&6 >&5 2>&7
}
# Wrap git with a debugger. Adding this to a command can make it easier
# to understand what is going on in a failing test.
#
# Usage: debug [options] <git command>
# -d <debugger>
# --debugger=<debugger>
# Use <debugger> instead of GDB
# -t
# Use your original TERM instead of test-lib.sh's "dumb".
# This usually restores color output in the debugger.
# WARNING: the command being debugged might behave differently than when
# running the test.
#
# Examples:
# debug git checkout master
# debug --debugger=nemiver git $ARGS
# debug -d "valgrind --tool=memcheck --track-origins=yes" git $ARGS
debug () {
GIT_DEBUGGER=1 &&
DEBUG_TERM=$TERM &&
while test $# != 0
do
case "$1" in
-t)
DEBUG_TERM="$USER_TERM"
;;
-d)
GIT_DEBUGGER="$2" &&
shift
;;
--debugger=*)
GIT_DEBUGGER="${1#*=}"
;;
*)
break
;;
esac
shift
done &&
dotfiles=".gdbinit .lldbinit"
for dotfile in $dotfiles
do
dotfile="$USER_HOME/$dotfile" &&
test -f "$dotfile" && cp "$dotfile" "$HOME" || :
done &&
TERM="$DEBUG_TERM" GIT_DEBUGGER="${GIT_DEBUGGER}" "$@" <&6 >&5 2>&7 &&
for dotfile in $dotfiles
do
rm -f "$HOME/$dotfile"
done
}
# Usage: test_commit [options] <message> [<file> [<contents> [<tag>]]]
# -C <dir>:
# Run all git commands in directory <dir>
# --notick
# Do not call test_tick before making a commit
# --append
# Use ">>" instead of ">" when writing "<contents>" to "<file>"
# --printf
# Use "printf" instead of "echo" when writing "<contents>" to
# "<file>", use this to write escape sequences such as "\0", a
# trailing "\n" won't be added automatically. This option
# supports nothing but the FORMAT of printf(1), i.e. no custom
# ARGUMENT(s).
# --signoff
# Invoke "git commit" with --signoff
# --author <author>
# Invoke "git commit" with --author <author>
# --no-tag
# Do not tag the resulting commit
# --annotate
# Create an annotated tag with "--annotate -m <message>". Calls
# test_tick between making the commit and tag, unless --notick
# is given.
#
# This will commit a file with the given contents and the given commit
# message, and tag the resulting commit with the given tag name.
#
# <file>, <contents>, and <tag> all default to <message>.
test_commit () {
notick= &&
echo=echo &&
append= &&
author= &&
signoff= &&
indir= &&
tag=light &&
while test $# != 0
do
case "$1" in
--notick)
notick=yes
;;
--printf)
echo=printf
;;
--append)
append=yes
;;
--author)
author="$2"
shift
;;
--signoff)
signoff="$1"
;;
--date)
notick=yes
GIT_COMMITTER_DATE="$2"
GIT_AUTHOR_DATE="$2"
shift
;;
-C)
indir="$2"
shift
;;
--no-tag)
tag=none
;;
--annotate)
tag=annotate
;;
*)
break
;;
esac
shift
done &&
indir=${indir:+"$indir"/} &&
file=${2:-"$1.t"} &&
if test -n "$append"
then
$echo "${3-$1}" >>"$indir$file"
else
$echo "${3-$1}" >"$indir$file"
fi &&
git ${indir:+ -C "$indir"} add -- "$file" &&
if test -z "$notick"
then
test_tick
fi &&
git ${indir:+ -C "$indir"} commit \
${author:+ --author "$author"} \
$signoff -m "$1" &&
case "$tag" in
none)
;;
light)
git ${indir:+ -C "$indir"} tag "${4:-$1}"
;;
annotate)
if test -z "$notick"
then
test_tick
fi &&
git ${indir:+ -C "$indir"} tag -a -m "$1" "${4:-$1}"
;;
esac
}
# Call test_merge with the arguments "<message> <commit>", where <commit>
# can be a tag pointing to the commit-to-merge.
test_merge () {
label="$1" &&
shift &&
test_tick &&
git merge -m "$label" "$@" &&
git tag "$label"
}
# Efficiently create <nr> commits, each with a unique number (from 1 to <nr>
# by default) in the commit message.
#
# Usage: test_commit_bulk [options] <nr>
# -C <dir>:
# Run all git commands in directory <dir>
# --ref=<n>:
# ref on which to create commits (default: HEAD)
# --start=<n>:
# number commit messages from <n> (default: 1)
# --message=<msg>:
# use <msg> as the commit mesasge (default: "commit %s")
# --filename=<fn>:
# modify <fn> in each commit (default: %s.t)
# --contents=<string>:
# place <string> in each file (default: "content %s")
# --id=<string>:
# shorthand to use <string> and %s in message, filename, and contents
#
# The message, filename, and contents strings are evaluated by printf, with the
# first "%s" replaced by the current commit number. So you can do:
#
# test_commit_bulk --filename=file --contents="modification %s"
#
# to have every commit touch the same file, but with unique content.
#
test_commit_bulk () {
tmpfile=.bulk-commit.input
indir=.
ref=HEAD
n=1
message='commit %s'
filename='%s.t'
contents='content %s'
while test $# -gt 0
do
case "$1" in
-C)
indir=$2
shift
;;
--ref=*)
ref=${1#--*=}
;;
--start=*)
n=${1#--*=}
;;
--message=*)
message=${1#--*=}
;;
--filename=*)
filename=${1#--*=}
;;
--contents=*)
contents=${1#--*=}
;;
--id=*)
message="${1#--*=} %s"
filename="${1#--*=}-%s.t"
contents="${1#--*=} %s"
;;
-*)
BUG "invalid test_commit_bulk option: $1"
;;
*)
break
;;
esac
shift
done
total=$1
add_from=
if git -C "$indir" rev-parse --quiet --verify "$ref"
then
add_from=t
fi
while test "$total" -gt 0
do
test_tick &&
echo "commit $ref"
printf 'author %s <%s> %s\n' \
"$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME" \
"$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL" \
"$GIT_AUTHOR_DATE"
printf 'committer %s <%s> %s\n' \
"$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME" \
"$GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL" \
"$GIT_COMMITTER_DATE"
echo "data <<EOF"
printf "$message\n" $n
echo "EOF"
if test -n "$add_from"
then
echo "from $ref^0"
add_from=
fi
printf "M 644 inline $filename\n" $n
echo "data <<EOF"
printf "$contents\n" $n
echo "EOF"
echo
n=$((n + 1))
total=$((total - 1))
done >"$tmpfile"
git -C "$indir" \
-c fastimport.unpacklimit=0 \
fast-import <"$tmpfile" || return 1
# This will be left in place on failure, which may aid debugging.
rm -f "$tmpfile"
# If we updated HEAD, then be nice and update the index and working
# tree, too.
if test "$ref" = "HEAD"
then
git -C "$indir" checkout -f HEAD || return 1
fi
}
# This function helps systems where core.filemode=false is set.
# Use it instead of plain 'chmod +x' to set or unset the executable bit
# of a file in the working directory and add it to the index.
test_chmod () {
chmod "$@" &&
git update-index --add "--chmod=$@"
}
# Get the modebits from a file or directory, ignoring the setgid bit (g+s).
# This bit is inherited by subdirectories at their creation. So we remove it
# from the returning string to prevent callers from having to worry about the
# state of the bit in the test directory.
#
test_modebits () {
ls -ld "$1" | sed -e 's|^\(..........\).*|\1|' \
-e 's|^\(......\)S|\1-|' -e 's|^\(......\)s|\1x|'
}
# Unset a configuration variable, but don't fail if it doesn't exist.
test_unconfig () {
config_dir=
if test "$1" = -C
then
shift
config_dir=$1
shift
fi
git ${config_dir:+-C "$config_dir"} config --unset-all "$@"
config_status=$?
case "$config_status" in
5) # ok, nothing to unset
config_status=0
;;
esac
return $config_status
}
# Set git config, automatically unsetting it after the test is over.
test_config () {
config_dir=
if test "$1" = -C
then
shift
config_dir=$1
shift
fi
test_when_finished "test_unconfig ${config_dir:+-C '$config_dir'} '$1'" &&
git ${config_dir:+-C "$config_dir"} config "$@"
}
test_config_global () {
test_when_finished "test_unconfig --global '$1'" &&
git config --global "$@"
}
write_script () {
{
echo "#!${2-"$SHELL_PATH"}" &&
cat
} >"$1" &&
chmod +x "$1"
}
# Usage: test_hook [options] <hook-name> <<-\EOF
#
# -C <dir>:
# Run all git commands in directory <dir>
# --setup
# Setup a hook for subsequent tests, i.e. don't remove it in a
# "test_when_finished"
# --clobber
# Overwrite an existing <hook-name>, if it exists. Implies
# --setup (i.e. the "test_when_finished" is assumed to have been
# set up already).
# --disable
# Disable (chmod -x) an existing <hook-name>, which must exist.
# --remove
# Remove (rm -f) an existing <hook-name>, which must exist.
test_hook () {
setup= &&
clobber= &&
disable= &&
remove= &&
indir= &&
while test $# != 0
do
case "$1" in
-C)
indir="$2" &&
shift
;;
--setup)
setup=t
;;
--clobber)
clobber=t
;;
--disable)
disable=t
;;
--remove)
remove=t
;;
-*)
BUG "invalid argument: $1"
;;
*)
break
;;
esac &&
shift
done &&
git_dir=$(git -C "$indir" rev-parse --absolute-git-dir) &&
hook_dir="$git_dir/hooks" &&
hook_file="$hook_dir/$1" &&
if test -n "$disable$remove"
then
test_path_is_file "$hook_file" &&
if test -n "$disable"
then
chmod -x "$hook_file"
elif test -n "$remove"
then
rm -f "$hook_file"
fi &&
return 0
fi &&
if test -z "$clobber"
then
test_path_is_missing "$hook_file"
fi &&
if test -z "$setup$clobber"
then
test_when_finished "rm \"$hook_file\""
fi &&
write_script "$hook_file"
}
# Use test_set_prereq to tell that a particular prerequisite is available.
# The prerequisite can later be checked for in two ways:
#
# - Explicitly using test_have_prereq.
#
# - Implicitly by specifying the prerequisite tag in the calls to
# test_expect_{success,failure} and test_external{,_without_stderr}.
#
# The single parameter is the prerequisite tag (a simple word, in all
# capital letters by convention).
test_unset_prereq () {
! test_have_prereq "$1" ||
satisfied_prereq="${satisfied_prereq% $1 *} ${satisfied_prereq#* $1 }"
}
test_set_prereq () {
if test -n "$GIT_TEST_FAIL_PREREQS_INTERNAL"
then
case "$1" in
# The "!" case is handled below with
# test_unset_prereq()
!*)
;;
# (Temporary?) whitelist of things we can't easily
# pretend not to support
SYMLINKS)
;;
# Inspecting whether GIT_TEST_FAIL_PREREQS is on
# should be unaffected.
FAIL_PREREQS)
;;
*)
return
esac
fi
case "$1" in
!*)
test_unset_prereq "${1#!}"
;;
*)
satisfied_prereq="$satisfied_prereq$1 "
;;
esac
}
satisfied_prereq=" "
lazily_testable_prereq= lazily_tested_prereq=
# Usage: test_lazy_prereq PREREQ 'script'
test_lazy_prereq () {
lazily_testable_prereq="$lazily_testable_prereq$1 "
eval test_prereq_lazily_$1=\$2
}
test_run_lazy_prereq_ () {
script='
mkdir -p "$TRASH_DIRECTORY/prereq-test-dir-'"$1"'" &&
(
cd "$TRASH_DIRECTORY/prereq-test-dir-'"$1"'" &&'"$2"'
)'
say >&3 "checking prerequisite: $1"
say >&3 "$script"
test_eval_ "$script"
eval_ret=$?
rm -rf "$TRASH_DIRECTORY/prereq-test-dir-$1"
if test "$eval_ret" = 0; then
say >&3 "prerequisite $1 ok"
else
say >&3 "prerequisite $1 not satisfied"
fi
return $eval_ret
}
test_have_prereq () {
# prerequisites can be concatenated with ','
save_IFS=$IFS
IFS=,
set -- $*
IFS=$save_IFS
total_prereq=0
ok_prereq=0
missing_prereq=
for prerequisite
do
case "$prerequisite" in
!*)
negative_prereq=t
prerequisite=${prerequisite#!}
;;
*)
negative_prereq=
esac
case " $lazily_tested_prereq " in
*" $prerequisite "*)
;;
*)
case " $lazily_testable_prereq " in
*" $prerequisite "*)
eval "script=\$test_prereq_lazily_$prerequisite" &&
if test_run_lazy_prereq_ "$prerequisite" "$script"
then
test_set_prereq $prerequisite
fi
lazily_tested_prereq="$lazily_tested_prereq$prerequisite "
esac
;;
esac
total_prereq=$(($total_prereq + 1))
case "$satisfied_prereq" in
*" $prerequisite "*)
satisfied_this_prereq=t
;;
*)
satisfied_this_prereq=
esac
case "$satisfied_this_prereq,$negative_prereq" in
t,|,t)
ok_prereq=$(($ok_prereq + 1))
;;
*)
# Keep a list of missing prerequisites; restore
# the negative marker if necessary.
prerequisite=${negative_prereq:+!}$prerequisite
# Abort if this prereq was marked as required
if test -n "$GIT_TEST_REQUIRE_PREREQ"
then
case " $GIT_TEST_REQUIRE_PREREQ " in
*" $prerequisite "*)
BAIL_OUT "required prereq $prerequisite failed"
;;
esac
fi
if test -z "$missing_prereq"
then
missing_prereq=$prerequisite
else
missing_prereq="$prerequisite,$missing_prereq"
fi
esac
done
test $total_prereq = $ok_prereq
}
test_declared_prereq () {
case ",$test_prereq," in
*,$1,*)
return 0
;;
esac
return 1
}
test_verify_prereq () {
test -z "$test_prereq" ||
expr >/dev/null "$test_prereq" : '[A-Z0-9_,!]*$' ||
BUG "'$test_prereq' does not look like a prereq"
}
test_expect_failure () {
test_start_
test "$#" = 3 && { test_prereq=$1; shift; } || test_prereq=
test "$#" = 2 ||
BUG "not 2 or 3 parameters to test-expect-failure"
test_verify_prereq
export test_prereq
if ! test_skip "$@"
then
say >&3 "checking known breakage of $TEST_NUMBER.$test_count '$1': $2"
if test_run_ "$2" expecting_failure
then
test_known_broken_ok_ "$1"
else
test_known_broken_failure_ "$1"
fi
fi
test_finish_
}
test_expect_success () {
test_start_
test "$#" = 3 && { test_prereq=$1; shift; } || test_prereq=
test "$#" = 2 ||
BUG "not 2 or 3 parameters to test-expect-success"
test_verify_prereq
export test_prereq
if ! test_skip "$@"
then
say >&3 "expecting success of $TEST_NUMBER.$test_count '$1': $2"
if test_run_ "$2"
then
test_ok_ "$1"
else
test_failure_ "$@"
fi
fi
test_finish_
}
# test_external runs external test scripts that provide continuous
# test output about their progress, and succeeds/fails on
# zero/non-zero exit code. It outputs the test output on stdout even
# in non-verbose mode, and announces the external script with "# run
# <n>: ..." before running it. When providing relative paths, keep in
# mind that all scripts run in "trash directory".
# Usage: test_external description command arguments...
# Example: test_external 'Perl API' perl ../path/to/test.pl
test_external () {
test "$#" = 4 && { test_prereq=$1; shift; } || test_prereq=
test "$#" = 3 ||
BUG "not 3 or 4 parameters to test_external"
descr="$1"
shift
test_verify_prereq
export test_prereq
if ! test_skip "$descr" "$@"
then
# Announce the script to reduce confusion about the
# test output that follows.
say_color "" "# run $test_count: $descr ($*)"
# Export TEST_DIRECTORY, TRASH_DIRECTORY and GIT_TEST_LONG
# to be able to use them in script
export TEST_DIRECTORY TRASH_DIRECTORY GIT_TEST_LONG
# Run command; redirect its stderr to &4 as in
# test_run_, but keep its stdout on our stdout even in
# non-verbose mode.
"$@" 2>&4
if test "$?" = 0
then
if test $test_external_has_tap -eq 0; then
test_ok_ "$descr"
else
say_color "" "# test_external test $descr was ok"
test_success=$(($test_success + 1))
fi
else
if test $test_external_has_tap -eq 0; then
test_failure_ "$descr" "$@"
else
say_color error "# test_external test $descr failed: $@"
test_failure=$(($test_failure + 1))
fi
fi
fi
}
# Like test_external, but in addition tests that the command generated
# no output on stderr.
test_external_without_stderr () {
# The temporary file has no (and must have no) security
# implications.
tmp=${TMPDIR:-/tmp}
stderr="$tmp/git-external-stderr.$$.tmp"
test_external "$@" 4> "$stderr"
test -f "$stderr" || error "Internal error: $stderr disappeared."
descr="no stderr: $1"
shift
say >&3 "# expecting no stderr from previous command"
if test ! -s "$stderr"
then
rm "$stderr"
if test $test_external_has_tap -eq 0; then
test_ok_ "$descr"
else
say_color "" "# test_external_without_stderr test $descr was ok"
test_success=$(($test_success + 1))
fi
else
if test "$verbose" = t
then
output=$(echo; echo "# Stderr is:"; cat "$stderr")
else
output=
fi
# rm first in case test_failure exits.
rm "$stderr"
if test $test_external_has_tap -eq 0; then
test_failure_ "$descr" "$@" "$output"
else
say_color error "# test_external_without_stderr test $descr failed: $@: $output"
test_failure=$(($test_failure + 1))
fi
fi
}
# debugging-friendly alternatives to "test [-f|-d|-e]"
# The commands test the existence or non-existence of $1
test_path_is_file () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
if ! test -f "$1"
then
echo "File $1 doesn't exist"
false
fi
}
test_path_is_file_not_symlink () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
test_path_is_file "$1" &&
if test -h "$1"
then
echo "$1 shouldn't be a symbolic link"
false
fi
}
test_path_is_dir () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
if ! test -d "$1"
then
echo "Directory $1 doesn't exist"
false
fi
}
test_path_is_dir_not_symlink () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
test_path_is_dir "$1" &&
if test -h "$1"
then
echo "$1 shouldn't be a symbolic link"
false
fi
}
test_path_exists () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
if ! test -e "$1"
then
echo "Path $1 doesn't exist"
false
fi
}
test_path_is_symlink () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
if ! test -h "$1"
then
echo "Symbolic link $1 doesn't exist"
false
fi
}
# Check if the directory exists and is empty as expected, barf otherwise.
test_dir_is_empty () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
test_path_is_dir "$1" &&
if test -n "$(ls -a1 "$1" | egrep -v '^\.\.?$')"
then
echo "Directory '$1' is not empty, it contains:"
ls -la "$1"
return 1
fi
}
# Check if the file exists and has a size greater than zero
test_file_not_empty () {
test "$#" = 2 && BUG "2 param"
if ! test -s "$1"
then
echo "'$1' is not a non-empty file."
false
fi
}
test_path_is_missing () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
if test -e "$1"
then
echo "Path exists:"
ls -ld "$1"
if test $# -ge 1
then
echo "$*"
fi
false
fi
}
# test_line_count checks that a file has the number of lines it
# ought to. For example:
#
# test_expect_success 'produce exactly one line of output' '
# do something >output &&
# test_line_count = 1 output
# '
#
# is like "test $(wc -l <output) = 1" except that it passes the
# output through when the number of lines is wrong.
test_line_count () {
if test $# != 3
then
BUG "not 3 parameters to test_line_count"
elif ! test $(wc -l <"$3") "$1" "$2"
then
echo "test_line_count: line count for $3 !$1 $2"
cat "$3"
return 1
fi
}
# SYNOPSIS:
# test_stdout_line_count <bin-ops> <value> <cmd> [<args>...]
#
# test_stdout_line_count checks that the output of a command has the number
# of lines it ought to. For example:
#
# test_stdout_line_count = 3 git ls-files -u
# test_stdout_line_count -gt 10 ls
test_stdout_line_count () {
local ops val trashdir &&
if test "$#" -le 3
then
BUG "expect 3 or more arguments"
fi &&
ops="$1" &&
val="$2" &&
shift 2 &&
if ! trashdir="$(git rev-parse --git-dir)/trash"; then
BUG "expect to be run inside a worktree"
fi &&
mkdir -p "$trashdir" &&
"$@" >"$trashdir/output" &&
test_line_count "$ops" "$val" "$trashdir/output"
}
test_file_size () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
test-tool path-utils file-size "$1"
}
# Returns success if a comma separated string of keywords ($1) contains a
# given keyword ($2).
# Examples:
# `list_contains "foo,bar" bar` returns 0
# `list_contains "foo" bar` returns 1
list_contains () {
case ",$1," in
*,$2,*)
return 0
;;
esac
return 1
}
# Returns success if the arguments indicate that a command should be
# accepted by test_must_fail(). If the command is run with env, the env
# and its corresponding variable settings will be stripped before we
# test the command being run.
test_must_fail_acceptable () {
if test "$1" = "env"
then
shift
while test $# -gt 0
do
case "$1" in
*?=*)
shift
;;
*)
break
;;
esac
done
fi
case "$1" in
git|__git*|test-tool|test_terminal)
return 0
;;
*)
return 1
;;
esac
}
# This is not among top-level (test_expect_success | test_expect_failure)
# but is a prefix that can be used in the test script, like:
#
# test_expect_success 'complain and die' '
# do something &&
# do something else &&
# test_must_fail git checkout ../outerspace
# '
#
# Writing this as "! git checkout ../outerspace" is wrong, because
# the failure could be due to a segv. We want a controlled failure.
#
# Accepts the following options:
#
# ok=<signal-name>[,<...>]:
# Don't treat an exit caused by the given signal as error.
# Multiple signals can be specified as a comma separated list.
# Currently recognized signal names are: sigpipe, success.
# (Don't use 'success', use 'test_might_fail' instead.)
#
# Do not use this to run anything but "git" and other specific testable
# commands (see test_must_fail_acceptable()). We are not in the
# business of vetting system supplied commands -- in other words, this
# is wrong:
#
# test_must_fail grep pattern output
#
# Instead use '!':
#
# ! grep pattern output
test_must_fail () {
case "$1" in
ok=*)
_test_ok=${1#ok=}
shift
;;
*)
_test_ok=
;;
esac
if ! test_must_fail_acceptable "$@"
then
echo >&7 "test_must_fail: only 'git' is allowed: $*"
return 1
fi
"$@" 2>&7
exit_code=$?
if test $exit_code -eq 0 && ! list_contains "$_test_ok" success
then
echo >&4 "test_must_fail: command succeeded: $*"
return 1
elif test_match_signal 13 $exit_code && list_contains "$_test_ok" sigpipe
then
return 0
elif test $exit_code -gt 129 && test $exit_code -le 192
then
echo >&4 "test_must_fail: died by signal $(($exit_code - 128)): $*"
return 1
elif test $exit_code -eq 127
then
echo >&4 "test_must_fail: command not found: $*"
return 1
elif test $exit_code -eq 126
then
echo >&4 "test_must_fail: valgrind error: $*"
return 1
fi
return 0
} 7>&2 2>&4
# Similar to test_must_fail, but tolerates success, too. This is
# meant to be used in contexts like:
#
# test_expect_success 'some command works without configuration' '
# test_might_fail git config --unset all.configuration &&
# do something
# '
#
# Writing "git config --unset all.configuration || :" would be wrong,
# because we want to notice if it fails due to segv.
#
# Accepts the same options as test_must_fail.
test_might_fail () {
test_must_fail ok=success "$@" 2>&7
} 7>&2 2>&4
# Similar to test_must_fail and test_might_fail, but check that a
# given command exited with a given exit code. Meant to be used as:
#
# test_expect_success 'Merge with d/f conflicts' '
# test_expect_code 1 git merge "merge msg" B master
# '
test_expect_code () {
want_code=$1
shift
"$@" 2>&7
exit_code=$?
if test $exit_code = $want_code
then
return 0
fi
echo >&4 "test_expect_code: command exited with $exit_code, we wanted $want_code $*"
return 1
} 7>&2 2>&4
# test_cmp is a helper function to compare actual and expected output.
# You can use it like:
#
# test_expect_success 'foo works' '
# echo expected >expected &&
# foo >actual &&
# test_cmp expected actual
# '
#
# This could be written as either "cmp" or "diff -u", but:
# - cmp's output is not nearly as easy to read as diff -u
# - not all diff versions understand "-u"
test_cmp () {
test "$#" -ne 2 && BUG "2 param"
eval "$GIT_TEST_CMP" '"$@"'
}
# Check that the given config key has the expected value.
#
# test_cmp_config [-C <dir>] <expected-value>
# [<git-config-options>...] <config-key>
#
# for example to check that the value of core.bar is foo
#
# test_cmp_config foo core.bar
#
test_cmp_config () {
local GD &&
if test "$1" = "-C"
then
shift &&
GD="-C $1" &&
shift
fi &&
printf "%s\n" "$1" >expect.config &&
shift &&
git $GD config "$@" >actual.config &&
test_cmp expect.config actual.config
}
# test_cmp_bin - helper to compare binary files
test_cmp_bin () {
test "$#" -ne 2 && BUG "2 param"
cmp "$@"
}
# Wrapper for grep which used to be used for
# GIT_TEST_GETTEXT_POISON=false. Only here as a shim for other
# in-flight changes. Should not be used and will be removed soon.
test_i18ngrep () {
eval "last_arg=\${$#}"
test -f "$last_arg" ||
BUG "test_i18ngrep requires a file to read as the last parameter"
if test $# -lt 2 ||
{ test "x!" = "x$1" && test $# -lt 3 ; }
then
BUG "too few parameters to test_i18ngrep"
fi
if test "x!" = "x$1"
then
shift
! grep "$@" && return 0
echo >&4 "error: '! grep $@' did find a match in:"
else
grep "$@" && return 0
echo >&4 "error: 'grep $@' didn't find a match in:"
fi
if test -s "$last_arg"
then
cat >&4 "$last_arg"
else
echo >&4 "<File '$last_arg' is empty>"
fi
return 1
}
# Call any command "$@" but be more verbose about its
# failure. This is handy for commands like "test" which do
# not output anything when they fail.
verbose () {
"$@" && return 0
echo >&4 "command failed: $(git rev-parse --sq-quote "$@")"
return 1
}
# Check if the file expected to be empty is indeed empty, and barfs
# otherwise.
test_must_be_empty () {
test "$#" -ne 1 && BUG "1 param"
test_path_is_file "$1" &&
if test -s "$1"
then
echo "'$1' is not empty, it contains:"
cat "$1"
return 1
fi
}
# Tests that its two parameters refer to the same revision, or if '!' is
# provided first, that its other two parameters refer to different
# revisions.
test_cmp_rev () {
local op='=' wrong_result=different
if test $# -ge 1 && test "x$1" = 'x!'
then
op='!='
wrong_result='the same'
shift
fi
if test $# != 2
then
BUG "test_cmp_rev requires two revisions, but got $#"
else
local r1 r2
r1=$(git rev-parse --verify "$1") &&
r2=$(git rev-parse --verify "$2") || return 1
if ! test "$r1" "$op" "$r2"
then
cat >&4 <<-EOF
error: two revisions point to $wrong_result objects:
'$1': $r1
'$2': $r2
EOF
return 1
fi
fi
}
# Compare paths respecting core.ignoreCase
test_cmp_fspath () {
if test "x$1" = "x$2"
then
return 0
fi
if test true != "$(git config --get --type=bool core.ignorecase)"
then
return 1
fi
test "x$(echo "$1" | tr A-Z a-z)" = "x$(echo "$2" | tr A-Z a-z)"
}
# Print a sequence of integers in increasing order, either with
# two arguments (start and end):
#
# test_seq 1 5 -- outputs 1 2 3 4 5 one line at a time
#
# or with one argument (end), in which case it starts counting
# from 1.
test_seq () {
case $# in
1) set 1 "$@" ;;
2) ;;
*) BUG "not 1 or 2 parameters to test_seq" ;;
esac
test_seq_counter__=$1
while test "$test_seq_counter__" -le "$2"
do
echo "$test_seq_counter__"
test_seq_counter__=$(( $test_seq_counter__ + 1 ))
done
}
# This function can be used to schedule some commands to be run
# unconditionally at the end of the test to restore sanity:
#
# test_expect_success 'test core.capslock' '
# git config core.capslock true &&
# test_when_finished "git config --unset core.capslock" &&
# hello world
# '
#
# That would be roughly equivalent to
#
# test_expect_success 'test core.capslock' '
# git config core.capslock true &&
# hello world
# git config --unset core.capslock
# '
#
# except that the greeting and config --unset must both succeed for
# the test to pass.
#
# Note that under --immediate mode, no clean-up is done to help diagnose
# what went wrong.
test_when_finished () {
# We cannot detect when we are in a subshell in general, but by
# doing so on Bash is better than nothing (the test will
# silently pass on other shells).
test "${BASH_SUBSHELL-0}" = 0 ||
BUG "test_when_finished does nothing in a subshell"
test_cleanup="{ $*
} && (exit \"\$eval_ret\"); eval_ret=\$?; $test_cleanup"
}
# This function can be used to schedule some commands to be run
# unconditionally at the end of the test script, e.g. to stop a daemon:
#
# test_expect_success 'test git daemon' '
# git daemon &
# daemon_pid=$! &&
# test_atexit 'kill $daemon_pid' &&
# hello world
# '
#
# The commands will be executed before the trash directory is removed,
# i.e. the atexit commands will still be able to access any pidfiles or
# socket files.
#
# Note that these commands will be run even when a test script run
# with '--immediate' fails. Be careful with your atexit commands to
# minimize any changes to the failed state.
test_atexit () {
# We cannot detect when we are in a subshell in general, but by
# doing so on Bash is better than nothing (the test will
# silently pass on other shells).
test "${BASH_SUBSHELL-0}" = 0 ||
BUG "test_atexit does nothing in a subshell"
test_atexit_cleanup="{ $*
} && (exit \"\$eval_ret\"); eval_ret=\$?; $test_atexit_cleanup"
}
# Deprecated wrapper for "git init", use "git init" directly instead
# Usage: test_create_repo <directory>
test_create_repo () {
git init "$@"
}
# This function helps on symlink challenged file systems when it is not
# important that the file system entry is a symbolic link.
# Use test_ln_s_add instead of "ln -s x y && git add y" to add a
# symbolic link entry y to the index.
test_ln_s_add () {
if test_have_prereq SYMLINKS
then
ln -s "$1" "$2" &&
git update-index --add "$2"
else
printf '%s' "$1" >"$2" &&
ln_s_obj=$(git hash-object -w "$2") &&
git update-index --add --cacheinfo 120000 $ln_s_obj "$2" &&
# pick up stat info from the file
git update-index "$2"
fi
}
# This function writes out its parameters, one per line
test_write_lines () {
printf "%s\n" "$@"
}
perl () {
command "$PERL_PATH" "$@" 2>&7
} 7>&2 2>&4
# Given the name of an environment variable with a bool value, normalize
# its value to a 0 (true) or 1 (false or empty string) return code.
#
# test_bool_env GIT_TEST_HTTPD <default-value>
#
# Return with code corresponding to the given default value if the variable
# is unset.
# Abort the test script if either the value of the variable or the default
# are not valid bool values.
test_bool_env () {
if test $# != 2
then
BUG "test_bool_env requires two parameters (variable name and default value)"
fi
git env--helper --type=bool --default="$2" --exit-code "$1"
ret=$?
case $ret in
0|1) # unset or valid bool value
;;
*) # invalid bool value or something unexpected
error >&7 "test_bool_env requires bool values both for \$$1 and for the default fallback"
;;
esac
return $ret
}
# Exit the test suite, either by skipping all remaining tests or by
# exiting with an error. If our prerequisite variable $1 falls back
# on a default assume we were opportunistically trying to set up some
# tests and we skip. If it is explicitly "true", then we report a failure.
#
# The error/skip message should be given by $2.
#
test_skip_or_die () {
if ! test_bool_env "$1" false
then
skip_all=$2
test_done
fi
error "$2"
}
# The following mingw_* functions obey POSIX shell syntax, but are actually
# bash scripts, and are meant to be used only with bash on Windows.
# A test_cmp function that treats LF and CRLF equal and avoids to fork
# diff when possible.
mingw_test_cmp () {
# Read text into shell variables and compare them. If the results
# are different, use regular diff to report the difference.
local test_cmp_a= test_cmp_b=
# When text came from stdin (one argument is '-') we must feed it
# to diff.
local stdin_for_diff=
# Since it is difficult to detect the difference between an
# empty input file and a failure to read the files, we go straight
# to diff if one of the inputs is empty.
if test -s "$1" && test -s "$2"
then
# regular case: both files non-empty
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ test_cmp_a <"$1"
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ test_cmp_b <"$2"
elif test -s "$1" && test "$2" = -
then
# read 2nd file from stdin
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ test_cmp_a <"$1"
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ test_cmp_b
stdin_for_diff='<<<"$test_cmp_b"'
elif test "$1" = - && test -s "$2"
then
# read 1st file from stdin
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ test_cmp_a
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ test_cmp_b <"$2"
stdin_for_diff='<<<"$test_cmp_a"'
fi
test -n "$test_cmp_a" &&
test -n "$test_cmp_b" &&
test "$test_cmp_a" = "$test_cmp_b" ||
eval "diff -u \"\$@\" $stdin_for_diff"
}
# $1 is the name of the shell variable to fill in
mingw_read_file_strip_cr_ () {
# Read line-wise using LF as the line separator
# and use IFS to strip CR.
local line
while :
do
if IFS=$'\r' read -r -d $'\n' line
then
# good
line=$line$'\n'
else
# we get here at EOF, but also if the last line
# was not terminated by LF; in the latter case,
# some text was read
if test -z "$line"
then
# EOF, really
break
fi
fi
eval "$1=\$$1\$line"
done
}
# Like "env FOO=BAR some-program", but run inside a subshell, which means
# it also works for shell functions (though those functions cannot impact
# the environment outside of the test_env invocation).
test_env () {
(
while test $# -gt 0
do
case "$1" in
*=*)
eval "${1%%=*}=\${1#*=}"
eval "export ${1%%=*}"
shift
;;
*)
"$@" 2>&7
exit
;;
esac
done
)
} 7>&2 2>&4
# Returns true if the numeric exit code in "$2" represents the expected signal
# in "$1". Signals should be given numerically.
test_match_signal () {
if test "$2" = "$((128 + $1))"
then
# POSIX
return 0
elif test "$2" = "$((256 + $1))"
then
# ksh
return 0
fi
return 1
}
# Read up to "$1" bytes (or to EOF) from stdin and write them to stdout.
test_copy_bytes () {
perl -e '
my $len = $ARGV[1];
while ($len > 0) {
my $s;
my $nread = sysread(STDIN, $s, $len);
die "cannot read: $!" unless defined($nread);
last unless $nread;
print $s;
$len -= $nread;
}
' - "$1"
}
# run "$@" inside a non-git directory
nongit () {
test -d non-repo ||
mkdir non-repo ||
return 1
(
GIT_CEILING_DIRECTORIES=$(pwd) &&
export GIT_CEILING_DIRECTORIES &&
cd non-repo &&
"$@" 2>&7
)
} 7>&2 2>&4
# These functions are historical wrappers around "test-tool pkt-line"
# for older tests. Use "test-tool pkt-line" itself in new tests.
packetize () {
if test $# -gt 0
then
packet="$*"
printf '%04x%s' "$((4 + ${#packet}))" "$packet"
else
test-tool pkt-line pack
fi
}
packetize_raw () {
test-tool pkt-line pack-raw-stdin
}
depacketize () {
test-tool pkt-line unpack
}
# Converts base-16 data into base-8. The output is given as a sequence of
# escaped octals, suitable for consumption by 'printf'.
hex2oct () {
perl -ne 'printf "\\%03o", hex for /../g'
}
# Set the hash algorithm in use to $1. Only useful when testing the testsuite.
test_set_hash () {
test_hash_algo="$1"
}
# Detect the hash algorithm in use.
test_detect_hash () {
test_hash_algo="${GIT_TEST_DEFAULT_HASH:-sha1}"
}
# Load common hash metadata and common placeholder object IDs for use with
# test_oid.
test_oid_init () {
test -n "$test_hash_algo" || test_detect_hash &&
test_oid_cache <"$TEST_DIRECTORY/oid-info/hash-info" &&
test_oid_cache <"$TEST_DIRECTORY/oid-info/oid"
}
# Load key-value pairs from stdin suitable for use with test_oid. Blank lines
# and lines starting with "#" are ignored. Keys must be shell identifier
# characters.
#
# Examples:
# rawsz sha1:20
# rawsz sha256:32
test_oid_cache () {
local tag rest k v &&
{ test -n "$test_hash_algo" || test_detect_hash; } &&
while read tag rest
do
case $tag in
\#*)
continue;;
?*)
# non-empty
;;
*)
# blank line
continue;;
esac &&
k="${rest%:*}" &&
v="${rest#*:}" &&
if ! expr "$k" : '[a-z0-9][a-z0-9]*$' >/dev/null
then
BUG 'bad hash algorithm'
fi &&
eval "test_oid_${k}_$tag=\"\$v\""
done
}
# Look up a per-hash value based on a key ($1). The value must have been loaded
# by test_oid_init or test_oid_cache.
test_oid () {
local algo="${test_hash_algo}" &&
case "$1" in
--hash=*)
algo="${1#--hash=}" &&
shift;;
*)
;;
esac &&
local var="test_oid_${algo}_$1" &&
# If the variable is unset, we must be missing an entry for this
# key-hash pair, so exit with an error.
if eval "test -z \"\${$var+set}\""
then
BUG "undefined key '$1'"
fi &&
eval "printf '%s' \"\${$var}\""
}
# Insert a slash into an object ID so it can be used to reference a location
# under ".git/objects". For example, "deadbeef..." becomes "de/adbeef..".
test_oid_to_path () {
local basename=${1#??}
echo "${1%$basename}/$basename"
}
# Choose a port number based on the test script's number and store it in
# the given variable name, unless that variable already contains a number.
test_set_port () {
local var=$1 port
if test $# -ne 1 || test -z "$var"
then
BUG "test_set_port requires a variable name"
fi
eval port=\$$var
case "$port" in
"")
# No port is set in the given env var, use the test
# number as port number instead.
# Remove not only the leading 't', but all leading zeros
# as well, so the arithmetic below won't (mis)interpret
# a test number like '0123' as an octal value.
port=${this_test#${this_test%%[1-9]*}}
if test "${port:-0}" -lt 1024
then
# root-only port, use a larger one instead.
port=$(($port + 10000))
fi
;;
*[!0-9]*|0*)
error >&7 "invalid port number: $port"
;;
*)
# The user has specified the port.
;;
esac
# Make sure that parallel '--stress' test jobs get different
# ports.
port=$(($port + ${GIT_TEST_STRESS_JOB_NR:-0}))
eval $var=$port
}
# Tests for the hidden file attribute on Windows
test_path_is_hidden () {
test_have_prereq MINGW ||
BUG "test_path_is_hidden can only be used on Windows"
# Use the output of `attrib`, ignore the absolute path
case "$("$SYSTEMROOT"/system32/attrib "$1")" in *H*?:*) return 0;; esac
return 1
}
# Check that the given command was invoked as part of the
# trace2-format trace on stdin.
#
# test_subcommand [!] <command> <args>... < <trace>
#
# For example, to look for an invocation of "git upload-pack
# /path/to/repo"
#
# GIT_TRACE2_EVENT=event.log git fetch ... &&
# test_subcommand git upload-pack "$PATH" <event.log
#
# If the first parameter passed is !, this instead checks that
# the given command was not called.
#
test_subcommand () {
local negate=
if test "$1" = "!"
then
negate=t
shift
fi
local expr=$(printf '"%s",' "$@")
expr="${expr%,}"
if test -n "$negate"
then
! grep "\[$expr\]"
else
grep "\[$expr\]"
fi
}
# Check that the given command was invoked as part of the
# trace2-format trace on stdin, but without an exact set of
# arguments.
#
# test_subcommand [!] <command> <args>... < <trace>
#
# For example, to look for an invocation of "git pack-objects"
# with the "--honor-pack-keep" argument, use
#
# GIT_TRACE2_EVENT=event.log git repack ... &&
# test_subcommand git pack-objects --honor-pack-keep <event.log
#
# If the first parameter passed is !, this instead checks that
# the given command was not called.
#
test_subcommand_inexact () {
local negate=
if test "$1" = "!"
then
negate=t
shift
fi
local expr=$(printf '"%s".*' "$@")
expr="${expr%,}"
if test -n "$negate"
then
! grep "\"event\":\"child_start\".*\[$expr\]"
else
grep "\"event\":\"child_start\".*\[$expr\]"
fi
}
# Check that the given command was invoked as part of the
# trace2-format trace on stdin.
#
# test_region [!] <category> <label> git <command> <args>...
#
# For example, to look for trace2_region_enter("index", "do_read_index", repo)
# in an invocation of "git checkout HEAD~1", run
#
# GIT_TRACE2_EVENT="$(pwd)/trace.txt" GIT_TRACE2_EVENT_NESTING=10 \
# git checkout HEAD~1 &&
# test_region index do_read_index <trace.txt
#
# If the first parameter passed is !, this instead checks that
# the given region was not entered.
#
test_region () {
local expect_exit=0
if test "$1" = "!"
then
expect_exit=1
shift
fi
grep -e '"region_enter".*"category":"'"$1"'","label":"'"$2"\" "$3"
exitcode=$?
if test $exitcode != $expect_exit
then
return 1
fi
grep -e '"region_leave".*"category":"'"$1"'","label":"'"$2"\" "$3"
exitcode=$?
if test $exitcode != $expect_exit
then
return 1
fi
return 0
}
# Print the destination of symlink(s) provided as arguments. Basically
# the same as the readlink command, but it's not available everywhere.
test_readlink () {
perl -le 'print readlink($_) for @ARGV' "$@"
}
# Set mtime to a fixed "magic" timestamp in mid February 2009, before we
# run an operation that may or may not touch the file. If the file was
# touched, its timestamp will not accidentally have such an old timestamp,
# as long as your filesystem clock is reasonably correct. To verify the
# timestamp, follow up with test_is_magic_mtime.
#
# An optional increment to the magic timestamp may be specified as second
# argument.
test_set_magic_mtime () {
local inc=${2:-0} &&
local mtime=$((1234567890 + $inc)) &&
test-tool chmtime =$mtime "$1" &&
test_is_magic_mtime "$1" $inc
}
# Test whether the given file has the "magic" mtime set. This is meant to
# be used in combination with test_set_magic_mtime.
#
# An optional increment to the magic timestamp may be specified as second
# argument. Usually, this should be the same increment which was used for
# the associated test_set_magic_mtime.
test_is_magic_mtime () {
local inc=${2:-0} &&
local mtime=$((1234567890 + $inc)) &&
echo $mtime >.git/test-mtime-expect &&
test-tool chmtime --get "$1" >.git/test-mtime-actual &&
test_cmp .git/test-mtime-expect .git/test-mtime-actual
local ret=$?
rm -f .git/test-mtime-expect
rm -f .git/test-mtime-actual
return $ret
}