git-cli.txt: clarify "options first and then args"

There are some commands permit the user whether to provide options
first before args, or the reverse order. For example:

    git push --dry-run <remote> <ref>

And:

    git push <remote> <ref> --dry-run

Both of them is supported, but some commands do not, for instance:

     git ls-remote --heads <remote>

And:

     git ls-remote <remote> --heads

If <remote> only has one ref and it's name is "refs/heads/--heads", you
will get the same result, otherwise will not.This is because the former
in the second example will parse "--heads" as an "option" which means
to limit to only "refs/heads" when listing the remote references, the
latter treat "--heads" as an argument which means to filter the result
list with the given pattern.

Therefore, we want to specify a bit more in "gitcli.txt" about the way
we recommend and help to resolve the ambiguity around some git command
usage. The related disscussions locate at [1].

By the way, there are some issues with lowercase letters in the document,
which have been modified together.

[1] https://public-inbox.org/git/cover.1642129840.git.dyroneteng@gmail.com/

Signed-off-by: Teng Long <dyroneteng@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
pull/1216/head
Teng Long 8 months ago committed by Junio C Hamano
parent e9d7761bb9
commit c11f95010c
  1. 19
      Documentation/gitcli.txt

@ -19,6 +19,15 @@ Many commands take revisions (most often "commits", but sometimes
"tree-ish", depending on the context and command) and paths as their
arguments. Here are the rules:
* Options come first and then args.
A subcommand may take dashed options (which may take their own
arguments, e.g. "--max-parents 2") and arguments. You SHOULD
give dashed options first and then arguments. Some commands may
accept dashed options after you have already gave non-option
arguments (which may make the command ambiguous), but you should
not rely on it (because eventually we may find a way to fix
these ambiguity by enforcing the "options then args" rule).
* Revisions come first and then paths.
E.g. in `git diff v1.0 v2.0 arch/x86 include/asm-x86`,
`v1.0` and `v2.0` are revisions and `arch/x86` and `include/asm-x86`
@ -72,24 +81,24 @@ you will.
Here are the rules regarding the "flags" that you should follow when you are
scripting Git:
* it's preferred to use the non-dashed form of Git commands, which means that
* It's preferred to use the non-dashed form of Git commands, which means that
you should prefer `git foo` to `git-foo`.
* splitting short options to separate words (prefer `git foo -a -b`
* Splitting short options to separate words (prefer `git foo -a -b`
to `git foo -ab`, the latter may not even work).
* when a command-line option takes an argument, use the 'stuck' form. In
* When a command-line option takes an argument, use the 'stuck' form. In
other words, write `git foo -oArg` instead of `git foo -o Arg` for short
options, and `git foo --long-opt=Arg` instead of `git foo --long-opt Arg`
for long options. An option that takes optional option-argument must be
written in the 'stuck' form.
* when you give a revision parameter to a command, make sure the parameter is
* When you give a revision parameter to a command, make sure the parameter is
not ambiguous with a name of a file in the work tree. E.g. do not write
`git log -1 HEAD` but write `git log -1 HEAD --`; the former will not work
if you happen to have a file called `HEAD` in the work tree.
* many commands allow a long option `--option` to be abbreviated
* Many commands allow a long option `--option` to be abbreviated
only to their unique prefix (e.g. if there is no other option
whose name begins with `opt`, you may be able to spell `--opt` to
invoke the `--option` flag), but you should fully spell them out

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