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git/git-bisect.sh

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[PATCH] Making it easier to find which change introduced a bug This adds a new "git bisect" command. - "git bisect start" start bisection search. - "git bisect bad <rev>" mark some version known-bad (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect good <revs>..." mark some versions known-good (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect reset <branch>" done with bisection search and go back to your work (if no arguments, then "master"). The way you use it is: git bisect start git bisect bad # Current version is bad git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version # tested that was good When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect the revision tree and say something like: Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just do git bisect good # this one is good which will now say Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect bad", and ask for the next bisection. Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad". Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a git bisect reset to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the bisection branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will reset the bisection state, and before it does that it checks that you're not using some old bisection branch). Not really any harder than doing series of "quilt push" and "quilt pop", now is it? [jc: This patch is a rework based on what Linus posted to the list. The changes are: - The original introduced four separate commands, which was three too many, so I merged them into one with subcommands. - Since the next thing you would want to do after telling it "bad" and "good" is always to bisect, this version does it automatically for you. - I think the termination condition was wrong. The original version checked if the set of revisions reachable from next bisection but not rechable from any of the known good ones is empty, but if the current bisection was a bad one, this would not terminate, so I changed it to terminate it when the set becomes a singleton or empty. - Removed the use of shell array variable. ] Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
18 years ago
#!/bin/sh
USAGE='[help|start|bad|good|new|old|terms|skip|next|reset|visualize|view|replay|log|run]'
LONG_USAGE='git bisect help
print this long help message.
git bisect start [--term-{new,bad}=<term> --term-{old,good}=<term>]
[--no-checkout] [--first-parent] [<bad> [<good>...]] [--] [<pathspec>...]
reset bisect state and start bisection.
bisect: add the terms old/new When not looking for a regression during a bisect but for a fix or a change in another given property, it can be confusing to use 'good' and 'bad'. This patch introduce `git bisect new` and `git bisect old` as an alternative to 'bad' and good': the commits which have a certain property must be marked as `new` and the ones which do not as `old`. The output will be the first commit after the change in the property. During a new/old bisect session you cannot use bad/good commands and vice-versa. Some commands are still not available for old/new: * git rev-list --bisect does not treat the revs/bisect/new and revs/bisect/old-SHA1 files. Old discussions: - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/86063 introduced bisect fix unfixed to find fix. - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/182398 discussion around bisect yes/no or old/new. - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/199758 last discussion and reviews New discussions: - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/271320 ( v2 1/7-4/7 ) - http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/271343 ( v2 5/7-7/7 ) Signed-off-by: Antoine Delaite <antoine.delaite@ensimag.grenoble-inp.fr> Signed-off-by: Louis Stuber <stuberl@ensimag.grenoble-inp.fr> Signed-off-by: Valentin Duperray <Valentin.Duperray@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Franck Jonas <Franck.Jonas@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Lucien Kong <Lucien.Kong@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Thomas Nguy <Thomas.Nguy@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Huynh Khoi Nguyen Nguyen <Huynh-Khoi-Nguyen.Nguyen@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Matthieu Moy <Matthieu.Moy@imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
8 years ago
git bisect (bad|new) [<rev>]
mark <rev> a known-bad revision/
a revision after change in a given property.
git bisect (good|old) [<rev>...]
mark <rev>... known-good revisions/
revisions before change in a given property.
git bisect terms [--term-good | --term-bad]
show the terms used for old and new commits (default: bad, good)
git bisect skip [(<rev>|<range>)...]
mark <rev>... untestable revisions.
git bisect next
find next bisection to test and check it out.
git bisect reset [<commit>]
finish bisection search and go back to commit.
git bisect (visualize|view)
show bisect status in gitk.
git bisect replay <logfile>
replay bisection log.
git bisect log
show bisect log.
git bisect run <cmd>...
use <cmd>... to automatically bisect.
Please use "git help bisect" to get the full man page.'
OPTIONS_SPEC=
. git-sh-setup
[PATCH] Making it easier to find which change introduced a bug This adds a new "git bisect" command. - "git bisect start" start bisection search. - "git bisect bad <rev>" mark some version known-bad (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect good <revs>..." mark some versions known-good (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect reset <branch>" done with bisection search and go back to your work (if no arguments, then "master"). The way you use it is: git bisect start git bisect bad # Current version is bad git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version # tested that was good When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect the revision tree and say something like: Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just do git bisect good # this one is good which will now say Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect bad", and ask for the next bisection. Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad". Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a git bisect reset to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the bisection branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will reset the bisection state, and before it does that it checks that you're not using some old bisection branch). Not really any harder than doing series of "quilt push" and "quilt pop", now is it? [jc: This patch is a rework based on what Linus posted to the list. The changes are: - The original introduced four separate commands, which was three too many, so I merged them into one with subcommands. - Since the next thing you would want to do after telling it "bad" and "good" is always to bisect, this version does it automatically for you. - I think the termination condition was wrong. The original version checked if the set of revisions reachable from next bisection but not rechable from any of the known good ones is empty, but if the current bisection was a bad one, this would not terminate, so I changed it to terminate it when the set becomes a singleton or empty. - Removed the use of shell array variable. ] Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
18 years ago
TERM_BAD=bad
TERM_GOOD=good
get_terms () {
if test -s "$GIT_DIR/BISECT_TERMS"
then
{
read TERM_BAD
read TERM_GOOD
} <"$GIT_DIR/BISECT_TERMS"
fi
}
[PATCH] Making it easier to find which change introduced a bug This adds a new "git bisect" command. - "git bisect start" start bisection search. - "git bisect bad <rev>" mark some version known-bad (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect good <revs>..." mark some versions known-good (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect reset <branch>" done with bisection search and go back to your work (if no arguments, then "master"). The way you use it is: git bisect start git bisect bad # Current version is bad git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version # tested that was good When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect the revision tree and say something like: Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just do git bisect good # this one is good which will now say Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect bad", and ask for the next bisection. Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad". Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a git bisect reset to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the bisection branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will reset the bisection state, and before it does that it checks that you're not using some old bisection branch). Not really any harder than doing series of "quilt push" and "quilt pop", now is it? [jc: This patch is a rework based on what Linus posted to the list. The changes are: - The original introduced four separate commands, which was three too many, so I merged them into one with subcommands. - Since the next thing you would want to do after telling it "bad" and "good" is always to bisect, this version does it automatically for you. - I think the termination condition was wrong. The original version checked if the set of revisions reachable from next bisection but not rechable from any of the known good ones is empty, but if the current bisection was a bad one, this would not terminate, so I changed it to terminate it when the set becomes a singleton or empty. - Removed the use of shell array variable. ] Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
18 years ago
case "$#" in
0)
usage ;;
[PATCH] Making it easier to find which change introduced a bug This adds a new "git bisect" command. - "git bisect start" start bisection search. - "git bisect bad <rev>" mark some version known-bad (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect good <revs>..." mark some versions known-good (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect reset <branch>" done with bisection search and go back to your work (if no arguments, then "master"). The way you use it is: git bisect start git bisect bad # Current version is bad git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version # tested that was good When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect the revision tree and say something like: Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just do git bisect good # this one is good which will now say Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect bad", and ask for the next bisection. Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad". Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a git bisect reset to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the bisection branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will reset the bisection state, and before it does that it checks that you're not using some old bisection branch). Not really any harder than doing series of "quilt push" and "quilt pop", now is it? [jc: This patch is a rework based on what Linus posted to the list. The changes are: - The original introduced four separate commands, which was three too many, so I merged them into one with subcommands. - Since the next thing you would want to do after telling it "bad" and "good" is always to bisect, this version does it automatically for you. - I think the termination condition was wrong. The original version checked if the set of revisions reachable from next bisection but not rechable from any of the known good ones is empty, but if the current bisection was a bad one, this would not terminate, so I changed it to terminate it when the set becomes a singleton or empty. - Removed the use of shell array variable. ] Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
18 years ago
*)
cmd="$1"
get_terms
shift
case "$cmd" in
help)
git bisect -h ;;
start)
git bisect--helper --bisect-start "$@" ;;
bisect: add the terms old/new When not looking for a regression during a bisect but for a fix or a change in another given property, it can be confusing to use 'good' and 'bad'. This patch introduce `git bisect new` and `git bisect old` as an alternative to 'bad' and good': the commits which have a certain property must be marked as `new` and the ones which do not as `old`. The output will be the first commit after the change in the property. During a new/old bisect session you cannot use bad/good commands and vice-versa. Some commands are still not available for old/new: * git rev-list --bisect does not treat the revs/bisect/new and revs/bisect/old-SHA1 files. Old discussions: - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/86063 introduced bisect fix unfixed to find fix. - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/182398 discussion around bisect yes/no or old/new. - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/199758 last discussion and reviews New discussions: - http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/271320 ( v2 1/7-4/7 ) - http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/271343 ( v2 5/7-7/7 ) Signed-off-by: Antoine Delaite <antoine.delaite@ensimag.grenoble-inp.fr> Signed-off-by: Louis Stuber <stuberl@ensimag.grenoble-inp.fr> Signed-off-by: Valentin Duperray <Valentin.Duperray@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Franck Jonas <Franck.Jonas@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Lucien Kong <Lucien.Kong@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Thomas Nguy <Thomas.Nguy@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Huynh Khoi Nguyen Nguyen <Huynh-Khoi-Nguyen.Nguyen@ensimag.imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Matthieu Moy <Matthieu.Moy@imag.fr> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
8 years ago
bad|good|new|old|"$TERM_BAD"|"$TERM_GOOD")
git bisect--helper --bisect-state "$cmd" "$@" ;;
skip)
git bisect--helper --bisect-skip "$@" || exit;;
next)
# Not sure we want "next" at the UI level anymore.
git bisect--helper --bisect-next "$@" || exit ;;
visualize|view)
git bisect--helper --bisect-visualize "$@" || exit;;
reset)
git bisect--helper --bisect-reset "$@" ;;
replay)
git bisect--helper --bisect-replay "$@" || exit;;
log)
git bisect--helper --bisect-log || exit ;;
run)
git bisect--helper --bisect-run "$@" || exit;;
terms)
git bisect--helper --bisect-terms "$@" || exit;;
*)
usage ;;
esac
[PATCH] Making it easier to find which change introduced a bug This adds a new "git bisect" command. - "git bisect start" start bisection search. - "git bisect bad <rev>" mark some version known-bad (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect good <revs>..." mark some versions known-good (if no arguments, then current HEAD) - "git bisect reset <branch>" done with bisection search and go back to your work (if no arguments, then "master"). The way you use it is: git bisect start git bisect bad # Current version is bad git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version # tested that was good When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect the revision tree and say something like: Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just do git bisect good # this one is good which will now say Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect bad", and ask for the next bisection. Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad". Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a git bisect reset to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the bisection branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will reset the bisection state, and before it does that it checks that you're not using some old bisection branch). Not really any harder than doing series of "quilt push" and "quilt pop", now is it? [jc: This patch is a rework based on what Linus posted to the list. The changes are: - The original introduced four separate commands, which was three too many, so I merged them into one with subcommands. - Since the next thing you would want to do after telling it "bad" and "good" is always to bisect, this version does it automatically for you. - I think the termination condition was wrong. The original version checked if the set of revisions reachable from next bisection but not rechable from any of the known good ones is empty, but if the current bisection was a bad one, this would not terminate, so I changed it to terminate it when the set becomes a singleton or empty. - Removed the use of shell array variable. ] Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
18 years ago
esac