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git/refspec.h

78 lines
2.3 KiB

#ifndef REFSPEC_H
#define REFSPEC_H
#define TAG_REFSPEC "refs/tags/*:refs/tags/*"
extern const struct refspec_item *tag_refspec;
/**
refspec: add support for negative refspecs Both fetch and push support pattern refspecs which allow fetching or pushing references that match a specific pattern. Because these patterns are globs, they have somewhat limited ability to express more complex situations. For example, suppose you wish to fetch all branches from a remote except for a specific one. To allow this, you must setup a set of refspecs which match only the branches you want. Because refspecs are either explicit name matches, or simple globs, many patterns cannot be expressed. Add support for a new type of refspec, referred to as "negative" refspecs. These are prefixed with a '^' and mean "exclude any ref matching this refspec". They can only have one "side" which always refers to the source. During a fetch, this refers to the name of the ref on the remote. During a push, this refers to the name of the ref on the local side. With negative refspecs, users can express more complex patterns. For example: git fetch origin refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/* ^refs/heads/dontwant will fetch all branches on origin into remotes/origin, but will exclude fetching the branch named dontwant. Refspecs today are commutative, meaning that order doesn't expressly matter. Rather than forcing an implied order, negative refspecs will always be applied last. That is, in order to match, a ref must match at least one positive refspec, and match none of the negative refspecs. This is similar to how negative pathspecs work. Signed-off-by: Jacob Keller <jacob.keller@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
* A struct refspec_item holds the parsed interpretation of a refspec. If it
* will force updates (starts with a '+'), force is true. If it is a pattern
* (sides end with '*') pattern is true. If it is a negative refspec, (starts
* with '^'), negative is true. src and dest are the two sides (including '*'
* characters if present); if there is only one side, it is src, and dst is
* NULL; if sides exist but are empty (i.e., the refspec either starts or ends
* with ':'), the corresponding side is "".
*
* remote_find_tracking(), given a remote and a struct refspec_item with either src
* or dst filled out, will fill out the other such that the result is in the
* "fetch" specification for the remote (note that this evaluates patterns and
* returns a single result).
*/
struct refspec_item {
unsigned force : 1;
unsigned pattern : 1;
unsigned matching : 1;
unsigned exact_sha1 : 1;
refspec: add support for negative refspecs Both fetch and push support pattern refspecs which allow fetching or pushing references that match a specific pattern. Because these patterns are globs, they have somewhat limited ability to express more complex situations. For example, suppose you wish to fetch all branches from a remote except for a specific one. To allow this, you must setup a set of refspecs which match only the branches you want. Because refspecs are either explicit name matches, or simple globs, many patterns cannot be expressed. Add support for a new type of refspec, referred to as "negative" refspecs. These are prefixed with a '^' and mean "exclude any ref matching this refspec". They can only have one "side" which always refers to the source. During a fetch, this refers to the name of the ref on the remote. During a push, this refers to the name of the ref on the local side. With negative refspecs, users can express more complex patterns. For example: git fetch origin refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/* ^refs/heads/dontwant will fetch all branches on origin into remotes/origin, but will exclude fetching the branch named dontwant. Refspecs today are commutative, meaning that order doesn't expressly matter. Rather than forcing an implied order, negative refspecs will always be applied last. That is, in order to match, a ref must match at least one positive refspec, and match none of the negative refspecs. This is similar to how negative pathspecs work. Signed-off-by: Jacob Keller <jacob.keller@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
unsigned negative : 1;
char *src;
char *dst;
};
#define REFSPEC_FETCH 1
#define REFSPEC_PUSH 0
#define REFSPEC_INIT_FETCH { .fetch = REFSPEC_FETCH }
#define REFSPEC_INIT_PUSH { .fetch = REFSPEC_PUSH }
/**
* An array of strings can be parsed into a struct refspec using
* parse_fetch_refspec() or parse_push_refspec().
*/
struct refspec {
struct refspec_item *items;
int alloc;
int nr;
const char **raw;
int raw_alloc;
int raw_nr;
int fetch;
};
int refspec_item_init(struct refspec_item *item, const char *refspec,
int fetch);
void refspec_item_init_or_die(struct refspec_item *item, const char *refspec,
int fetch);
void refspec_item_clear(struct refspec_item *item);
void refspec_init(struct refspec *rs, int fetch);
void refspec_append(struct refspec *rs, const char *refspec);
__attribute__((format (printf,2,3)))
void refspec_appendf(struct refspec *rs, const char *fmt, ...);
void refspec_appendn(struct refspec *rs, const char **refspecs, int nr);
void refspec_clear(struct refspec *rs);
int valid_fetch_refspec(const char *refspec);
int valid_remote_name(const char *name);
argv-array: rename to strvec The name "argv-array" isn't very good, because it describes what the data type can be used for (program argument arrays), not what it actually is (a dynamically-growing string array that maintains a NULL-terminator invariant). This leads to people being hesitant to use it for other cases where it would actually be a good fit. The existing name is also clunky to use. It's overly long, and the name often leads to saying things like "argv.argv" (i.e., the field names overlap with variable names, since they're describing the use, not the type). Let's give it a more neutral name. I settled on "strvec" because "vector" is the name for a dynamic array type in many programming languages. "strarray" would work, too, but it's longer and a bit more awkward to say (and don't we all say these things in our mind as we type them?). A more extreme direction would be a generic data structure which stores a NULL-terminated of _any_ type. That would be easy to do with void pointers, but we'd lose some type safety for the existing cases. Plus it raises questions about memory allocation and ownership. So I limited myself here to changing names only, and not semantics. If we do find a use for that more generic data type, we could perhaps implement it at a lower level and then provide type-safe wrappers around it for strings. But that can come later. This patch does the minimum to convert the struct and function names in the header and implementation, leaving a few things for follow-on patches: - files retain their original names for now - struct field names are retained for now - there's a preprocessor compat layer that lets most users remain the same for now. The exception is headers which made a manual forward declaration of the struct. I've converted them (and their dependent function declarations) here. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
struct strvec;
fetch: do not pass ref-prefixes for fetch by exact SHA1 When v2.18.0-rc0~10^2~1 (refspec: consolidate ref-prefix generation logic, 2018-05-16) factored out the ref-prefix generation code for reuse, it left out the 'if (!item->exact_sha1)' test in the original ref-prefix generation code. As a result, fetches by SHA-1 generate ref-prefixes as though the SHA-1 being fetched were an abbreviated ref name: $ GIT_TRACE_PACKET=1 bin-wrappers/git -c protocol.version=2 \ fetch origin 12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 [...] packet: fetch> ref-prefix 12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/tags/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/heads/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/remotes/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/remotes/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448/HEAD packet: fetch> 0000 If there is another ref name on the command line or the object being fetched is already available locally, then that's mostly harmless. But otherwise, we error out with fatal: no matching remote head since the server did not send any refs we are interested in. Filter out the exact_sha1 refspecs to avoid this. This patch adds a test to check this behavior that notices another behavior difference between protocol v0 and v2 in the process. Add a NEEDSWORK comment to clear it up. Signed-off-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 years ago
/*
* Determine what <prefix> values to pass to the peer in ref-prefix lines
* (see linkgit:gitprotocol-v2[5]).
fetch: do not pass ref-prefixes for fetch by exact SHA1 When v2.18.0-rc0~10^2~1 (refspec: consolidate ref-prefix generation logic, 2018-05-16) factored out the ref-prefix generation code for reuse, it left out the 'if (!item->exact_sha1)' test in the original ref-prefix generation code. As a result, fetches by SHA-1 generate ref-prefixes as though the SHA-1 being fetched were an abbreviated ref name: $ GIT_TRACE_PACKET=1 bin-wrappers/git -c protocol.version=2 \ fetch origin 12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 [...] packet: fetch> ref-prefix 12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/tags/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/heads/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/remotes/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448 packet: fetch> ref-prefix refs/remotes/12039e008f9a4e3394f3f94f8ea897785cb09448/HEAD packet: fetch> 0000 If there is another ref name on the command line or the object being fetched is already available locally, then that's mostly harmless. But otherwise, we error out with fatal: no matching remote head since the server did not send any refs we are interested in. Filter out the exact_sha1 refspecs to avoid this. This patch adds a test to check this behavior that notices another behavior difference between protocol v0 and v2 in the process. Add a NEEDSWORK comment to clear it up. Signed-off-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 years ago
*/
void refspec_ref_prefixes(const struct refspec *rs,
argv-array: rename to strvec The name "argv-array" isn't very good, because it describes what the data type can be used for (program argument arrays), not what it actually is (a dynamically-growing string array that maintains a NULL-terminator invariant). This leads to people being hesitant to use it for other cases where it would actually be a good fit. The existing name is also clunky to use. It's overly long, and the name often leads to saying things like "argv.argv" (i.e., the field names overlap with variable names, since they're describing the use, not the type). Let's give it a more neutral name. I settled on "strvec" because "vector" is the name for a dynamic array type in many programming languages. "strarray" would work, too, but it's longer and a bit more awkward to say (and don't we all say these things in our mind as we type them?). A more extreme direction would be a generic data structure which stores a NULL-terminated of _any_ type. That would be easy to do with void pointers, but we'd lose some type safety for the existing cases. Plus it raises questions about memory allocation and ownership. So I limited myself here to changing names only, and not semantics. If we do find a use for that more generic data type, we could perhaps implement it at a lower level and then provide type-safe wrappers around it for strings. But that can come later. This patch does the minimum to convert the struct and function names in the header and implementation, leaving a few things for follow-on patches: - files retain their original names for now - struct field names are retained for now - there's a preprocessor compat layer that lets most users remain the same for now. The exception is headers which made a manual forward declaration of the struct. I've converted them (and their dependent function declarations) here. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
struct strvec *ref_prefixes);
#endif /* REFSPEC_H */