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# Core GIT Translations
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
This directory holds the translations for the core of Git. This document
describes how you can contribute to the effort of enhancing the language
coverage and maintaining the translation.
The localization (l10n) coordinator, Jiang Xin <worldhello.net@gmail.com>,
coordinates our localization effort in the l10n coordinator repository:
https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
We will use XX as an alias to refer to the language translation code in
the following paragraphs, for example we use "po/XX.po" to refer to the
translation file for a specific language. But this doesn't mean that
the language code has only two letters. The language code can be in one
of two forms: "ll" or "ll\_CC". Here "ll" is the ISO 639 two-letter
language code and "CC" is the ISO 3166 two-letter code for country names
and subdivisions. For example: "de" for German language code, "zh\_CN"
for Simplified Chinese language code.
## Contributing to an existing translation
As a contributor for a language XX, you should first check TEAMS file in
this directory to see whether a dedicated repository for your language XX
exists. Fork the dedicated repository and start to work if it exists.
Sometime, contributors may find that the translations of their Git
distributions are quite different with the translations of the
corresponding version from Git official. This is because some Git
distributions (such as from Ubuntu, etc.) have their own l10n workflow.
For this case, wrong translations should be reported and fixed through
their workflows.
## Creating a new language translation
If you are the first contributor for the language XX, please fork this
repository, prepare and/or update the translated message file "po/XX.po"
(described later), and ask the l10n coordinator to pull your work.
If there are multiple contributors for the same language, please first
coordinate among yourselves and nominate the team leader for your
language, so that the l10n coordinator only needs to interact with one
person per language.
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
## Translation Process Flow
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
The overall data-flow looks like this:
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
+-------------------+ +------------------+
| Git source code | ----(2)---> | L10n coordinator |
| repository | <---(5)---- | repository |
+-------------------+ +------------------+
| | ^
(1) (3) (4)
V v |
+----------------------------------+
| Language Team XX |
+----------------------------------+
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
- Translatable strings are marked in the source file.
- Language teams can start translation iterations at any time, even
before the l10n window opens:
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
+ Pull from the master branch of the source (1)
+ Update the message file by running "make po-update PO\_FILE=po/XX.po"
+ Translate the message file "po/XX.po"
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
- The L10n coordinator pulls from source and announces the l10n window
open (2)
- Language team pulls from the l10n coordinator, starts another
translation iteration against the l10n coordinator's tree (3)
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
+ Run "git pull --rebase" from the l10n coordinator
+ Update the message file by running "make po-update PO\_FILE=po/XX.po"
+ Translate the message file "po/XX.po"
+ Squash trivial l10n git commits using "git rebase -i"
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
- Language team sends pull request to the l10n coordinator (4)
- L10n coordinator checks and merges
- L10n coordinator asks the result to be pulled (5).
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
## Dynamically generated POT files
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
POT files are templates for l10n contributors to create or update their
translation files. We used to have the "po/git.pot" file which was
generated by the l10n coordinator, but this file had been removed from
the tree.
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
The two POT files "po/git.pot" and "po/git-core.pot" can be created
dynamically when necessary.
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
L10n contributors use "po/git.pot" to prepare translations for their
languages, but they are not expected to modify it. The "po/git.pot" file
can be generated manually with the following command:
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
```shell
make po/git.pot
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
The "po/git-core.pot" file is the template for core translations. A core
translation is the minimum set of work necessary to complete a
translation of a new language. Since there are more than 5000 messages
in the full set of template message file "po/git.pot" that need to be
translated, this is not a piece of cake for new language contributors.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
The "core" template file "po/git-core.pot" can be generated manually
by running:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
```shell
make po/git-core.pot
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
## Initializing a "XX.po" file
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
(This is done by the language teams).
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
If your language XX does not have translated message file "po/XX.po" yet,
you add a translation for the first time by running:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
make po-init PO_FILE=po/XX.po
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
where XX is the locale, e.g. "de", "is", "pt\_BR", "zh\_CN", etc.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
The newly generated message file "po/XX.po" is based on the core pot
file "po/git-core.pot", so it contains only a minimal set of messages
and it's a good start for a new language contribution.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Once you are done testing the translation (see below), commit the result
and ask the l10n coordinator to pull from you.
## Updating a "XX.po" file
(This is done by the language teams).
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
If you are replacing translation strings in an existing "XX.po" file to
improve the translation, just edit the file.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
If you want to find new translatable strings in source files of upstream
repository and propagate them to your "po/XX.po", run command:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
make po-update PO_FILE=po/XX.po
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
It will:
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
- Call "make po/git.pot" to generate new "po/git.pot" file
- Call "msgmerge --add-location --backup=off -U po/XX.po po/git.pot"
to update your "po/XX.po"
- The "--add-location" option for msgmerge will add location lines,
and these location lines will help translation tools to locate
translation context easily.
Once you are done testing the translation (see below), it's better
to commit a location-less "po/XX.po" file to save repository space
and make a user-friendly patch for review.
To save a location-less "po/XX.po" automatically in repository, you
can:
First define a new attribute for "po/XX.po" by appending the following
line in ".git/info/attributes":
```
/po/XX.po filter=gettext-no-location
```
Then define the driver for the "gettext-no-location" clean filter to
strip out both filenames and locations from the contents as follows:
```shell
git config --global filter.gettext-no-location.clean \
"msgcat --no-location -"
```
For users who have gettext version 0.20 or higher, it is also possible
to define a clean filter to preserve filenames but not locations:
```shell
git config --global filter.gettext-no-location.clean \
"msgcat --add-location=file -"
```
You're now ready to ask the l10n coordinator to pull from you.
## Fuzzy translation
Fuzzy translation is a translation marked by comment "fuzzy" to let you
know that the translation is out of date because the "msgid" has been
changed. A fuzzy translation will be ignored when compiling using "msgfmt".
Fuzzy translation can be marked by hands, but for most cases they are
marked automatically when running "msgmerge" to update your "XX.po" file.
After fixing the corresponding translation, you must remove the "fuzzy"
tag in the comment.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
## Testing your changes
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
(This is done by the language teams, after creating or updating "XX.po" file).
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Before you submit your changes go back to the top-level and do:
```shell
make
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
On systems with GNU gettext (i.e. not Solaris) this will compile your
changed PO file with `msgfmt --check`, the --check option flags many
common errors, e.g. missing printf format strings, or translated
messages that deviate from the originals in whether they begin/end
with a newline or not.
l10n: Document the new l10n workflow Change the "flow" of how translators interact with the l10n repository at [1] to adjust it for a new workflow of not having a po/git.pot file in-tree at all, and to not commit line numbers to the po/*.po files that we do track in tree. The current workflow was added in a combination of dce37b66fb0 (l10n: initial git.pot for 1.7.10 upcoming release, 2012-02-13) and 271ce198cd0 (Update l10n guide, 2012-02-29). As noted in preceding commits I think that it came about due to technical debt I'd left behind in how the "po/git.pot" file was created, and a mis-impression that the file:line comments were needed as anything more than a transitory translation aid. As the updated po/README.md shows the new workflow is substantially the same, the difference is that translators no longer need to initially pull from the l10n coordinator for a new po/git.pot, they can simply use git.git's canonical source repository. The l10n coordinator is still expected to announce a release to translate, which presumably would always be Junio's latest release tag. I'm not certain if this part of the process is actually important. I.e. the delta translation-wise between that tag and "master" is usually pretty small, so perhaps translators can just work on "master" instead. 1. https://github.com/git-l10n/git-po/ Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jiang Xin <zhiyou.jx@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 months ago
L10n coordinator will check your contributions using a helper program
(see "PO helper" section below):
```shell
git-po-helper check-po po/XX.po
git-po-helper check-commits <rev-list-opts>
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
## Marking strings for translation
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
(This is done by the core developers).
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Before strings can be translated they first have to be marked for
translation.
Git uses an internationalization interface that wraps the system's
gettext library, so most of the advice in your gettext documentation
(on GNU systems `info gettext` in a terminal) applies.
General advice:
- Don't mark everything for translation, only strings which will be
read by humans (the porcelain interface) should be translated.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
The output from Git's plumbing utilities will primarily be read by
programs and would break scripts under non-C locales if it was
translated. Plumbing strings should not be translated, since
they're part of Git's API.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
- Adjust the strings so that they're easy to translate. Most of the
advice in `info '(gettext)Preparing Strings'` applies here.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
- Strings referencing numbers of items may need to be split into singular and
plural forms; see the Q\_() wrapper in the C sub-section below for an
example.
- If something is unclear or ambiguous you can use a "TRANSLATORS"
comment to tell the translators what to make of it. These will be
extracted by xgettext(1) and put in the "po/\*.po" files, e.g. from
git-am.sh:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
# TRANSLATORS: Make sure to include [y], [n], [e], [v] and [a]
# in your translation. The program will only accept English
# input at this point.
gettext "Apply? [y]es/[n]o/[e]dit/[v]iew patch/[a]ccept all "
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Or in C, from builtin/revert.c:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```c
/* TRANSLATORS: %s will be "revert" or "cherry-pick" */
die(_("%s: Unable to write new index file"), action_name(opts));
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
We provide wrappers for C, Shell and Perl programs. Here's how they're
used:
### C
Include builtin.h at the top, it'll pull in gettext.h, which
defines the gettext interface. Consult with the list if you need to
use gettext.h directly.
The C interface is a subset of the normal GNU gettext
interface. We currently export these functions:
- \_()
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Mark and translate a string. E.g.:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```c
printf(_("HEAD is now at %s"), hex);
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
- Q\_()
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Mark and translate a plural string. E.g.:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```c
printf(Q_("%d commit", "%d commits", number_of_commits));
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
This is just a wrapper for the ngettext() function.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
- N\_()
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
A no-op pass-through macro for marking strings inside static
initializations, e.g.:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```c
static const char *reset_type_names[] = {
N_("mixed"), N_("soft"), N_("hard"), N_("merge"), N_("keep"), NULL
};
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
And then, later:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```c
die(_("%s reset is not allowed in a bare repository"),
_(reset_type_names[reset_type]));
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Here `_()` couldn't have statically determined what the translation
string will be, but since it was already marked for translation
with `N_()` the look-up in the message catalog will succeed.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
### Shell
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
The Git gettext shell interface is just a wrapper for
gettext.sh. Import it right after git-sh-setup like this:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
. git-sh-setup
. git-sh-i18n
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
And then use the `gettext` or `eval_gettext` functions:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
# For constant interface messages:
gettext "A message for the user"; echo
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
# To interpolate variables:
details="oh noes"
eval_gettext "An error occurred: \$details"; echo
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
In addition we have wrappers for messages that end with a trailing
newline. I.e. you could write the above as:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
# For constant interface messages:
gettextln "A message for the user"
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
# To interpolate variables:
details="oh noes"
eval_gettextln "An error occurred: \$details"
```
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
More documentation about the interface is available in the GNU info
page: `info '(gettext)sh'`. Looking at git-am.sh (the first shell
command to be translated) for examples is also useful:
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
```shell
git log --reverse -p --grep=i18n git-am.sh