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git/object.h

223 lines
7.3 KiB

#ifndef OBJECT_H
#define OBJECT_H
#include "cache.h"
struct buffer_slab;
struct parsed_object_pool {
struct object **obj_hash;
int nr_objs, obj_hash_size;
/* TODO: migrate alloc_states to mem-pool? */
struct alloc_state *blob_state;
struct alloc_state *tree_state;
struct alloc_state *commit_state;
struct alloc_state *tag_state;
struct alloc_state *object_state;
/* parent substitutions from .git/info/grafts and .git/shallow */
struct commit_graft **grafts;
int grafts_alloc, grafts_nr;
int is_shallow;
struct stat_validity *shallow_stat;
char *alternate_shallow_file;
int commit_graft_prepared;
commit.c: don't persist substituted parents when unshallowing Since 37b9dcabfc (shallow.c: use '{commit,rollback}_shallow_file', 2020-04-22), Git knows how to reset stat-validity checks for the $GIT_DIR/shallow file, allowing it to change between a shallow and non-shallow state in the same process (e.g., in the case of 'git fetch --unshallow'). However, when $GIT_DIR/shallow changes, Git does not alter or remove any grafts (nor substituted parents) in memory. This comes up in a "git fetch --unshallow" with fetch.writeCommitGraph set to true. Ordinarily in a shallow repository (and before 37b9dcabfc, even in this case), commit_graph_compatible() would return false, indicating that the repository should not be used to write a commit-graphs (since commit-graph files cannot represent a shallow history). But since 37b9dcabfc, in an --unshallow operation that check succeeds. Thus even though the repository isn't shallow any longer (that is, we have all of the objects), the in-core representation of those objects still has munged parents at the shallow boundaries. When the commit-graph write proceeds, we use the incorrect parentage, producing wrong results. There are two ways for a user to work around this: either (1) set 'fetch.writeCommitGraph' to 'false', or (2) drop the commit-graph after unshallowing. One way to fix this would be to reset the parsed object pool entirely (flushing the cache and thus preventing subsequent reads from modifying their parents) after unshallowing. That would produce a problem when callers have a now-stale reference to the old pool, and so this patch implements a different approach. Instead, attach a new bit to the pool, 'substituted_parent', which indicates if the repository *ever* stored a commit which had its parents modified (i.e., the shallow boundary prior to unshallowing). This bit needs to be sticky because all reads subsequent to modifying a commit's parents are unreliable when unshallowing. Modify the check in 'commit_graph_compatible' to take this bit into account, and correctly avoid generating commit-graphs in this case, thus solving the bug. Helped-by: Derrick Stolee <dstolee@microsoft.com> Helped-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> Reported-by: Jay Conrod <jayconrod@google.com> Reviewed-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Taylor Blau <me@ttaylorr.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
int substituted_parent;
struct buffer_slab *buffer_slab;
};
struct parsed_object_pool *parsed_object_pool_new(void);
void parsed_object_pool_clear(struct parsed_object_pool *o);
struct object_list {
struct object *item;
struct object_list *next;
};
Add "named object array" concept We've had this notion of a "object_list" for a long time, which eventually grew a "name" member because some users (notably git-rev-list) wanted to name each object as it is generated. That object_list is great for some things, but it isn't all that wonderful for others, and the "name" member is generally not used by everybody. This patch splits the users of the object_list array up into two: the traditional list users, who want the list-like format, and who don't actually use or want the name. And another class of users that really used the list as an extensible array, and generally wanted to name the objects. The patch is fairly straightforward, but it's also biggish. Most of it really just cleans things up: switching the revision parsing and listing over to the array makes things like the builtin-diff usage much simpler (we now see exactly how many members the array has, and we don't get the objects reversed from the order they were on the command line). One of the main reasons for doing this at all is that the malloc overhead of the simple object list was actually pretty high, and the array is just a lot denser. So this patch brings down memory usage by git-rev-list by just under 3% (on top of all the other memory use optimizations) on the mozilla archive. It does add more lines than it removes, and more importantly, it adds a whole new infrastructure for maintaining lists of objects, but on the other hand, the new dynamic array code is pretty obvious. The change to builtin-diff-tree.c shows a fairly good example of why an array interface is sometimes more natural, and just much simpler for everybody. Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
17 years ago
struct object_array {
unsigned int nr;
unsigned int alloc;
struct object_array_entry {
struct object *item;
object_array_entry: fix memory handling of the name field Previously, the memory management of the object_array_entry::name field was inconsistent and undocumented. object_array_entries are ultimately created by a single function, add_object_array_with_mode(), which has an argument "const char *name". This function used to simply set the name field to reference the string pointed to by the name parameter, and nobody on the object_array side ever freed the memory. Thus, it assumed that the memory for the name field would be managed by the caller, and that the lifetime of that string would be at least as long as the lifetime of the object_array_entry. But callers were inconsistent: * Some passed pointers to constant strings or argv entries, which was OK. * Some passed pointers to newly-allocated memory, but didn't arrange for the memory ever to be freed. * Some passed the return value of sha1_to_hex(), which is a pointer to a statically-allocated buffer that can be overwritten at any time. * Some passed pointers to refnames that they received from a for_each_ref()-type iteration, but the lifetimes of such refnames is not guaranteed by the refs API. Bring consistency to this mess by changing object_array to make its own copy for the object_array_entry::name field and free this memory when an object_array_entry is deleted from the array. Many callers were passing the empty string as the name parameter, so as a performance optimization, treat the empty string specially. Instead of making a copy, store a pointer to a statically-allocated empty string to object_array_entry::name. When deleting such an entry, skip the free(). Change the callers that were already passing copies to add_object_array_with_mode() to either skip the copy, or (if the memory needed to be allocated anyway) freeing the memory itself. A part of this commit effectively reverts 70d26c6e76 read_revisions_from_stdin: make copies for handle_revision_arg because the copying introduced by that commit (which is still necessary) is now done at a deeper level. Signed-off-by: Michael Haggerty <mhagger@alum.mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
9 years ago
/*
* name or NULL. If non-NULL, the memory pointed to
* is owned by this object *except* if it points at
* object_array_slopbuf, which is a static copy of the
* empty string.
*/
char *name;
char *path;
unsigned mode;
Add "named object array" concept We've had this notion of a "object_list" for a long time, which eventually grew a "name" member because some users (notably git-rev-list) wanted to name each object as it is generated. That object_list is great for some things, but it isn't all that wonderful for others, and the "name" member is generally not used by everybody. This patch splits the users of the object_list array up into two: the traditional list users, who want the list-like format, and who don't actually use or want the name. And another class of users that really used the list as an extensible array, and generally wanted to name the objects. The patch is fairly straightforward, but it's also biggish. Most of it really just cleans things up: switching the revision parsing and listing over to the array makes things like the builtin-diff usage much simpler (we now see exactly how many members the array has, and we don't get the objects reversed from the order they were on the command line). One of the main reasons for doing this at all is that the malloc overhead of the simple object list was actually pretty high, and the array is just a lot denser. So this patch brings down memory usage by git-rev-list by just under 3% (on top of all the other memory use optimizations) on the mozilla archive. It does add more lines than it removes, and more importantly, it adds a whole new infrastructure for maintaining lists of objects, but on the other hand, the new dynamic array code is pretty obvious. The change to builtin-diff-tree.c shows a fairly good example of why an array interface is sometimes more natural, and just much simpler for everybody. Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
17 years ago
} *objects;
};
#define OBJECT_ARRAY_INIT { 0 }
/*
* object flag allocation:
* revision.h: 0---------10 15 23------27
fetch: teach independent negotiation (no packfile) Currently, the packfile negotiation step within a Git fetch cannot be done independent of sending the packfile, even though there is at least one application wherein this is useful. Therefore, make it possible for this negotiation step to be done independently. A subsequent commit will use this for one such application - push negotiation. This feature is for protocol v2 only. (An implementation for protocol v0 would require a separate implementation in the fetch, transport, and transport helper code.) In the protocol, the main hindrance towards independent negotiation is that the server can unilaterally decide to send the packfile. This is solved by a "wait-for-done" argument: the server will then wait for the client to say "done". In practice, the client will never say it; instead it will cease requests once it is satisfied. In the client, the main change lies in the transport and transport helper code. fetch_refs_via_pack() performs everything needed - protocol version and capability checks, and the negotiation itself. There are 2 code paths that do not go through fetch_refs_via_pack() that needed to be individually excluded: the bundle transport (excluded through requiring smart_options, which the bundle transport doesn't support) and transport helpers that do not support takeover. If or when we support independent negotiation for protocol v0, we will need to modify these 2 code paths to support it. But for now, report failure if independent negotiation is requested in these cases. Signed-off-by: Jonathan Tan <jonathantanmy@google.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
1 year ago
* fetch-pack.c: 01 67
* negotiator/default.c: 2--5
* walker.c: 0-2
* upload-pack.c: 4 11-----14 16-----19
* builtin/blame.c: 12-13
* bisect.c: 16
* bundle.c: 16
http-push: ensure unforced pushes fail when data would be lost When we push using the DAV-based protocol, the client is the one that performs the ref updates and therefore makes the checks to see whether an unforced push should be allowed. We make this check by determining if either (a) we lack the object file for the old value of the ref or (b) the new value of the ref is not newer than the old value, and in either case, reject the push. However, the ref_newer function, which performs this latter check, has an odd behavior due to the reuse of certain object flags. Specifically, it will incorrectly return false in its first invocation and then correctly return true on a subsequent invocation. This occurs because the object flags used by http-push.c are the same as those used by commit-reach.c, which implements ref_newer, and one piece of code misinterprets the flags set by the other. Note that this does not occur in all cases. For example, if the example used in the tests is changed to use one repository instead of two and rewind the head to add a commit, the test passes and we correctly reject the push. However, the example provided does trigger this behavior, and the code has been broken in this way since at least Git 2.0.0. To solve this problem, let's move the two sets of object flags so that they don't overlap, since we're clearly using them at the same time. The new set should not conflict with other usage because other users are either builtin code (which is not compiled into git http-push) or upload-pack (which we similarly do not use here). Reported-by: Michael Ward <mward@smartsoftwareinc.com> Signed-off-by: René Scharfe <l.s.r@web.de> Signed-off-by: brian m. carlson <sandals@crustytoothpaste.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
* http-push.c: 11-----14
commit-graph: fix writing first commit-graph during fetch The previous commit includes a failing test for an issue around fetch.writeCommitGraph and fetching in a repo with a submodule. Here, we fix that bug and set the test to "test_expect_success". The problem arises with this set of commands when the remote repo at <url> has a submodule. Note that --recurse-submodules is not needed to demonstrate the bug. $ git clone <url> test $ cd test $ git -c fetch.writeCommitGraph=true fetch origin Computing commit graph generation numbers: 100% (12/12), done. BUG: commit-graph.c:886: missing parent <hash1> for commit <hash2> Aborted (core dumped) As an initial fix, I converted the code in builtin/fetch.c that calls write_commit_graph_reachable() to instead launch a "git commit-graph write --reachable --split" process. That code worked, but is not how we want the feature to work long-term. That test did demonstrate that the issue must be something to do with internal state of the 'git fetch' process. The write_commit_graph() method in commit-graph.c ensures the commits we plan to write are "closed under reachability" using close_reachable(). This method walks from the input commits, and uses the UNINTERESTING flag to mark which commits have already been visited. This allows the walk to take O(N) time, where N is the number of commits, instead of O(P) time, where P is the number of paths. (The number of paths can be exponential in the number of commits.) However, the UNINTERESTING flag is used in lots of places in the codebase. This flag usually means some barrier to stop a commit walk, such as in revision-walking to compare histories. It is not often cleared after the walk completes because the starting points of those walks do not have the UNINTERESTING flag, and clear_commit_marks() would stop immediately. This is happening during a 'git fetch' call with a remote. The fetch negotiation is comparing the remote refs with the local refs and marking some commits as UNINTERESTING. I tested running clear_commit_marks_many() to clear the UNINTERESTING flag inside close_reachable(), but the tips did not have the flag, so that did nothing. It turns out that the calculate_changed_submodule_paths() method is at fault. Thanks, Peff, for pointing out this detail! More specifically, for each submodule, the collect_changed_submodules() runs a revision walk to essentially do file-history on the list of submodules. That revision walk marks commits UNININTERESTING if they are simplified away by not changing the submodule. Instead, I finally arrived on the conclusion that I should use a flag that is not used in any other part of the code. In commit-reach.c, a number of flags were defined for commit walk algorithms. The REACHABLE flag seemed like it made the most sense, and it seems it was not actually used in the file. The REACHABLE flag was used in early versions of commit-reach.c, but was removed by 4fbcca4 (commit-reach: make can_all_from_reach... linear, 2018-07-20). Add the REACHABLE flag to commit-graph.c and use it instead of UNINTERESTING in close_reachable(). This fixes the bug in manual testing. Reported-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de> Helped-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Helped-by: Szeder Gábor <szeder.dev@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Derrick Stolee <dstolee@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
3 years ago
* commit-graph.c: 15
* commit-reach.c: 16-----19
* sha1-name.c: 20
* list-objects-filter.c: 21
* builtin/fsck.c: 0--3
* builtin/gc.c: 0
* builtin/index-pack.c: 2021
* reflog.c: 10--12
* builtin/show-branch.c: 0-------------------------------------------26
* builtin/unpack-objects.c: 2021
*/
#define FLAG_BITS 28
/*
* The object type is stored in 3 bits.
*/
struct object {
unsigned parsed : 1;
unsigned type : TYPE_BITS;
unsigned flags : FLAG_BITS;
struct object_id oid;
};
const char *type_name(unsigned int type);
int type_from_string_gently(const char *str, ssize_t, int gentle);
#define type_from_string(str) type_from_string_gently(str, -1, 0)
/*
* Return the current number of buckets in the object hashmap.
*/
unsigned int get_max_object_index(void);
/*
* Return the object from the specified bucket in the object hashmap.
*/
struct object *get_indexed_object(unsigned int);
/*
* This can be used to see if we have heard of the object before, but
* it can return "yes we have, and here is a half-initialised object"
* for an object that we haven't loaded/parsed yet.
*
* When parsing a commit to create an in-core commit object, its
* parents list holds commit objects that represent its parents, but
* they are expected to be lazily initialized and do not know what
* their trees or parents are yet. When this function returns such a
* half-initialised objects, the caller is expected to initialize them
* by calling parse_object() on them.
*/
struct object *lookup_object(struct repository *r, const struct object_id *oid);
void *create_object(struct repository *r, const struct object_id *oid, void *obj);
void *object_as_type(struct object *obj, enum object_type type, int quiet);
add object_as_type helper for casting objects When we call lookup_commit, lookup_tree, etc, the logic goes something like: 1. Look for an existing object struct. If we don't have one, allocate and return a new one. 2. Double check that any object we have is the expected type (and complain and return NULL otherwise). 3. Convert an object with type OBJ_NONE (from a prior call to lookup_unknown_object) to the expected type. We can encapsulate steps 2 and 3 in a helper function which checks whether we have the expected object type, converts OBJ_NONE as appropriate, and returns the object. Not only does this shorten the code, but it also provides one central location for converting OBJ_NONE objects into objects of other types. Future patches will use that to enforce type-specific invariants. Since this is a refactoring, we would want it to behave exactly as the current code. It takes a little reasoning to see that this is the case: - for lookup_{commit,tree,etc} functions, we are just pulling steps 2 and 3 into a function that does the same thing. - for the call in peel_object, we currently only do step 3 (but we want to consolidate it with the others, as mentioned above). However, step 2 is a noop here, as the surrounding conditional makes sure we have OBJ_NONE (which we want to keep to avoid an extraneous call to sha1_object_info). - for the call in lookup_commit_reference_gently, we are currently doing step 2 but not step 3. However, step 3 is a noop here. The object we got will have just come from deref_tag, which must have figured out the type for each object in order to know when to stop peeling. Therefore the type will never be OBJ_NONE. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
8 years ago
/*
* Returns the object, having parsed it to find out what it is.
*
* Returns NULL if the object is missing or corrupt.
*/
parse_object(): allow skipping hash check The parse_object() function checks the object hash of any object it parses. This is a nice feature, as it means we may catch bit corruption during normal use, rather than waiting for specific fsck operations. But it also can be slow. It's particularly noticeable for blobs, where except for the hash check, we could return without loading the object contents at all. Now one may wonder what is the point of calling parse_object() on a blob in the first place then, but usually it's not intentional: we were fed an oid from somewhere, don't know the type, and want an object struct. For commits and trees, the parsing is usually helpful; we're about to look at the contents anyway. But this is less true for blobs, where we may be collecting them as part of a reachability traversal, etc, and don't actually care what's in them. And blobs, of course, tend to be larger. We don't want to just throw out the hash-checks for blobs, though. We do depend on them in some circumstances (e.g., rev-list --verify-objects uses parse_object() to check them). It's only the callers that know how they're going to use the result. And so we can help them by providing a special flag to skip the hash check. We could just apply this to blobs, as they're going to be the main source of performance improvement. But if a caller doesn't care about checking the hash, we might as well skip it for other object types, too. Even though we can't avoid reading the object contents, we can still skip the actual hash computation. If this seems like it is making Git a little bit less safe against corruption, it may be. But it's part of a series of tradeoffs we're already making. For instance, "rev-list --objects" does not open the contents of blobs it prints. And when a commit graph is present, we skip opening most commits entirely. The important thing will be to use this flag in cases where it's safe to skip the check. For instance, when serving a pack for a fetch, we know the client will fully index the objects and do a connectivity check itself. There's little to be gained from the server side re-hashing a blob itself. And indeed, most of the time we don't! The revision machinery won't open up a blob reached by traversal, but only one requested directly with a "want" line. So applied properly, this new feature shouldn't make anything less safe in practice. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
3 weeks ago
enum parse_object_flags {
PARSE_OBJECT_SKIP_HASH_CHECK = 1 << 0,
};
struct object *parse_object(struct repository *r, const struct object_id *oid);
parse_object(): allow skipping hash check The parse_object() function checks the object hash of any object it parses. This is a nice feature, as it means we may catch bit corruption during normal use, rather than waiting for specific fsck operations. But it also can be slow. It's particularly noticeable for blobs, where except for the hash check, we could return without loading the object contents at all. Now one may wonder what is the point of calling parse_object() on a blob in the first place then, but usually it's not intentional: we were fed an oid from somewhere, don't know the type, and want an object struct. For commits and trees, the parsing is usually helpful; we're about to look at the contents anyway. But this is less true for blobs, where we may be collecting them as part of a reachability traversal, etc, and don't actually care what's in them. And blobs, of course, tend to be larger. We don't want to just throw out the hash-checks for blobs, though. We do depend on them in some circumstances (e.g., rev-list --verify-objects uses parse_object() to check them). It's only the callers that know how they're going to use the result. And so we can help them by providing a special flag to skip the hash check. We could just apply this to blobs, as they're going to be the main source of performance improvement. But if a caller doesn't care about checking the hash, we might as well skip it for other object types, too. Even though we can't avoid reading the object contents, we can still skip the actual hash computation. If this seems like it is making Git a little bit less safe against corruption, it may be. But it's part of a series of tradeoffs we're already making. For instance, "rev-list --objects" does not open the contents of blobs it prints. And when a commit graph is present, we skip opening most commits entirely. The important thing will be to use this flag in cases where it's safe to skip the check. For instance, when serving a pack for a fetch, we know the client will fully index the objects and do a connectivity check itself. There's little to be gained from the server side re-hashing a blob itself. And indeed, most of the time we don't! The revision machinery won't open up a blob reached by traversal, but only one requested directly with a "want" line. So applied properly, this new feature shouldn't make anything less safe in practice. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
3 weeks ago
struct object *parse_object_with_flags(struct repository *r,
const struct object_id *oid,
enum parse_object_flags flags);
/*
* Like parse_object, but will die() instead of returning NULL. If the
* "name" parameter is not NULL, it is included in the error message
* (otherwise, the hex object ID is given).
*/
struct object *parse_object_or_die(const struct object_id *oid, const char *name);
/* Given the result of read_sha1_file(), returns the object after
* parsing it. eaten_p indicates if the object has a borrowed copy
* of buffer and the caller should not free() it.
*/
struct object *parse_object_buffer(struct repository *r, const struct object_id *oid, enum object_type type, unsigned long size, void *buffer, int *eaten_p);
/*
* Allocate and return an object struct, even if you do not know the type of
* the object. The returned object may have its "type" field set to a real type
* (if somebody previously called lookup_blob(), etc), or it may be set to
* OBJ_NONE. In the latter case, subsequent calls to lookup_blob(), etc, will
* set the type field as appropriate.
*
* Use this when you do not know the expected type of an object and want to
* avoid parsing it for efficiency reasons. Try to avoid it otherwise; it
* may allocate excess memory, since the returned object must be as large as
* the maximum struct of any type.
*/
struct object *lookup_unknown_object(struct repository *r, const struct object_id *oid);
/*
* Dispatch to the appropriate lookup_blob(), lookup_commit(), etc, based on
* "type".
*/
struct object *lookup_object_by_type(struct repository *r, const struct object_id *oid,
enum object_type type);
struct object_list *object_list_insert(struct object *item,
struct object_list **list_p);
int object_list_contains(struct object_list *list, struct object *obj);
void object_list_free(struct object_list **list);
Add "named object array" concept We've had this notion of a "object_list" for a long time, which eventually grew a "name" member because some users (notably git-rev-list) wanted to name each object as it is generated. That object_list is great for some things, but it isn't all that wonderful for others, and the "name" member is generally not used by everybody. This patch splits the users of the object_list array up into two: the traditional list users, who want the list-like format, and who don't actually use or want the name. And another class of users that really used the list as an extensible array, and generally wanted to name the objects. The patch is fairly straightforward, but it's also biggish. Most of it really just cleans things up: switching the revision parsing and listing over to the array makes things like the builtin-diff usage much simpler (we now see exactly how many members the array has, and we don't get the objects reversed from the order they were on the command line). One of the main reasons for doing this at all is that the malloc overhead of the simple object list was actually pretty high, and the array is just a lot denser. So this patch brings down memory usage by git-rev-list by just under 3% (on top of all the other memory use optimizations) on the mozilla archive. It does add more lines than it removes, and more importantly, it adds a whole new infrastructure for maintaining lists of objects, but on the other hand, the new dynamic array code is pretty obvious. The change to builtin-diff-tree.c shows a fairly good example of why an array interface is sometimes more natural, and just much simpler for everybody. Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
17 years ago
/* Object array handling .. */
void add_object_array(struct object *obj, const char *name, struct object_array *array);
void add_object_array_with_path(struct object *obj, const char *name, struct object_array *array, unsigned mode, const char *path);
object_array: add and use `object_array_pop()` In a couple of places, we pop objects off an object array `foo` by decreasing `foo.nr`. We access `foo.nr` in many places, but most if not all other times we do so read-only, e.g., as we iterate over the array. But when we change `foo.nr` behind the array's back, it feels a bit nasty and looks like it might leak memory. Leaks happen if the popped element has an allocated `name` or `path`. At the moment, that is not the case. Still, 1) the object array might gain more fields that want to be freed, 2) a code path where we pop might start using names or paths, 3) one of these code paths might be copied to somewhere where we do, and 4) using a dedicated function for popping is conceptually cleaner. Introduce and use `object_array_pop()` instead. Release memory in the new function. Document that popping an object leaves the associated elements in limbo. The converted places were identified by grepping for "\.nr\>" and looking for "--". Make the new function return NULL on an empty array. This is consistent with `pop_commit()` and allows the following: while ((o = object_array_pop(&foo)) != NULL) { // do something } But as noted above, we don't need to go out of our way to avoid reading `foo.nr`. This is probably more readable: while (foo.nr) { ... o = object_array_pop(&foo); // do something } The name of `object_array_pop()` does not quite align with `add_object_array()`. That is unfortunate. On the other hand, it matches `object_array_clear()`. Arguably it's `add_...` that is the odd one out, since it reads like it's used to "add" an "object array". For that reason, side with `object_array_clear()`. Signed-off-by: Martin Ågren <martin.agren@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
/*
* Returns NULL if the array is empty. Otherwise, returns the last object
* after removing its entry from the array. Other resources associated
* with that object are left in an unspecified state and should not be
* examined.
*/
struct object *object_array_pop(struct object_array *array);
typedef int (*object_array_each_func_t)(struct object_array_entry *, void *);
/*
* Apply want to each entry in array, retaining only the entries for
* which the function returns true. Preserve the order of the entries
* that are retained.
*/
void object_array_filter(struct object_array *array,
object_array_each_func_t want, void *cb_data);
/*
* Remove from array all but the first entry with a given name.
* Warning: this function uses an O(N^2) algorithm.
*/
void object_array_remove_duplicates(struct object_array *array);
Add "named object array" concept We've had this notion of a "object_list" for a long time, which eventually grew a "name" member because some users (notably git-rev-list) wanted to name each object as it is generated. That object_list is great for some things, but it isn't all that wonderful for others, and the "name" member is generally not used by everybody. This patch splits the users of the object_list array up into two: the traditional list users, who want the list-like format, and who don't actually use or want the name. And another class of users that really used the list as an extensible array, and generally wanted to name the objects. The patch is fairly straightforward, but it's also biggish. Most of it really just cleans things up: switching the revision parsing and listing over to the array makes things like the builtin-diff usage much simpler (we now see exactly how many members the array has, and we don't get the objects reversed from the order they were on the command line). One of the main reasons for doing this at all is that the malloc overhead of the simple object list was actually pretty high, and the array is just a lot denser. So this patch brings down memory usage by git-rev-list by just under 3% (on top of all the other memory use optimizations) on the mozilla archive. It does add more lines than it removes, and more importantly, it adds a whole new infrastructure for maintaining lists of objects, but on the other hand, the new dynamic array code is pretty obvious. The change to builtin-diff-tree.c shows a fairly good example of why an array interface is sometimes more natural, and just much simpler for everybody. Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
17 years ago
/*
* Remove any objects from the array, freeing all used memory; afterwards
* the array is ready to store more objects with add_object_array().
*/
void object_array_clear(struct object_array *array);
void clear_object_flags(unsigned flags);
/*
* Clear the specified object flags from all in-core commit objects from
* the specified repository.
*/
void repo_clear_commit_marks(struct repository *r, unsigned int flags);
#endif /* OBJECT_H */