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git/environment.c

426 lines
11 KiB

/*
* We put all the git config variables in this same object
* file, so that programs can link against the config parser
* without having to link against all the rest of git.
*
* In particular, no need to bring in libz etc unless needed,
* even if you might want to know where the git directory etc
* are.
*/
#include "cache.h"
#include "branch.h"
#include "environment.h"
#include "repository.h"
#include "config.h"
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
#include "refs.h"
#include "fmt-merge-msg.h"
#include "commit.h"
#include "strvec.h"
#include "object-store.h"
#include "tmp-objdir.h"
set_work_tree: use chdir_notify When we change to the top of the working tree, we manually re-adjust $GIT_DIR and call set_git_dir() again, in order to update any relative git-dir we'd compute earlier. Instead of the work-tree code having to know to call the git-dir code, let's use the new chdir_notify interface. There are two spots that need updating, with a few subtleties in each: 1. the set_git_dir() code needs to chdir_notify_register() so it can be told when to update its path. Technically we could push this down into repo_set_gitdir(), so that even repository structs besides the_repository could benefit from this. But that opens up a lot of complications: - we'd still need to touch set_git_dir(), because it does some other setup (like setting $GIT_DIR in the environment) - submodules using other repository structs get cleaned up, which means we'd need to remove them from the chdir_notify list - it's unlikely to fix any bugs, since we shouldn't generally chdir() in the middle of working on a submodule 2. setup_work_tree now needs to call chdir_notify(), and can lose its manual set_git_dir() call. Note that at first glance it looks like this undoes the absolute-to-relative optimization added by 044bbbcb63 (Make git_dir a path relative to work_tree in setup_work_tree(), 2008-06-19). But for the most part that optimization was just _undoing_ the relative-to-absolute conversion which the function was doing earlier (and which is now gone). It is true that if you already have an absolute git_dir that the setup_work_tree() function will no longer make it relative as a side effect. But: - we generally do have relative git-dir's due to the way the discovery code works - if we really care about making git-dir's relative when possible, then we should be relativizing them earlier (e.g., when we see an absolute $GIT_DIR we could turn it relative, whether we are going to chdir into a worktree or not). That would cover all cases, including ones that 044bbbcb63 did not. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
#include "chdir-notify.h"
#include "shallow.h"
int trust_executable_bit = 1;
int trust_ctime = 1;
int check_stat = 1;
int has_symlinks = 1;
int minimum_abbrev = 4, default_abbrev = -1;
int ignore_case;
int assume_unchanged;
int prefer_symlink_refs;
int is_bare_repository_cfg = -1; /* unspecified */
int warn_ambiguous_refs = 1;
cat-file: disable object/refname ambiguity check for batch mode A common use of "cat-file --batch-check" is to feed a list of objects from "rev-list --objects" or a similar command. In this instance, all of our input objects are 40-byte sha1 ids. However, cat-file has always allowed arbitrary revision specifiers, and feeds the result to get_sha1(). Fortunately, get_sha1() recognizes a 40-byte sha1 before doing any hard work trying to look up refs, meaning this scenario should end up spending very little time converting the input into an object sha1. However, since 798c35f (get_sha1: warn about full or short object names that look like refs, 2013-05-29), when we encounter this case, we spend the extra effort to do a refname lookup anyway, just to print a warning. This is further exacerbated by ca91993 (get_packed_ref_cache: reload packed-refs file when it changes, 2013-06-20), which makes individual ref lookup more expensive by requiring a stat() of the packed-refs file for each missing ref. With no patches, this is the time it takes to run: $ git rev-list --objects --all >objects $ time git cat-file --batch-check='%(objectname)' <objects on the linux.git repository: real 1m13.494s user 0m25.924s sys 0m47.532s If we revert ca91993, the packed-refs up-to-date check, it gets a little better: real 0m54.697s user 0m21.692s sys 0m32.916s but we are still spending quite a bit of time on ref lookup (and we would not want to revert that patch, anyway, which has correctness issues). If we revert 798c35f, disabling the warning entirely, we get a much more reasonable time: real 0m7.452s user 0m6.836s sys 0m0.608s This patch does the moral equivalent of this final case (and gets similar speedups). We introduce a global flag that callers of get_sha1() can use to avoid paying the price for the warning. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
9 years ago
int warn_on_object_refname_ambiguity = 1;
int repository_format_precious_objects;
worktree: add per-worktree config files A new repo extension is added, worktreeConfig. When it is present: - Repository config reading by default includes $GIT_DIR/config _and_ $GIT_DIR/config.worktree. "config" file remains shared in multiple worktree setup. - The special treatment for core.bare and core.worktree, to stay effective only in main worktree, is gone. These config settings are supposed to be in config.worktree. This extension is most useful in multiple worktree setup because you now have an option to store per-worktree config (which is either .git/config.worktree for main worktree, or .git/worktrees/xx/config.worktree for linked ones). This extension can be used in single worktree mode, even though it's pretty much useless (but this can happen after you remove all linked worktrees and move back to single worktree). "git config" reads from both "config" and "config.worktree" by default (i.e. without either --user, --file...) when this extension is present. Default writes still go to "config", not "config.worktree". A new option --worktree is added for that (*). Since a new repo extension is introduced, existing git binaries should refuse to access to the repo (both from main and linked worktrees). So they will not misread the config file (i.e. skip the config.worktree part). They may still accidentally write to the config file anyway if they use with "git config --file <path>". This design places a bet on the assumption that the majority of config variables are shared so it is the default mode. A safer move would be default writes go to per-worktree file, so that accidental changes are isolated. (*) "git config --worktree" points back to "config" file when this extension is not present and there is only one worktree so that it works in any both single and multiple worktree setups. Signed-off-by: Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy <pclouds@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 years ago
int repository_format_worktree_config;
const char *git_commit_encoding;
const char *git_log_output_encoding;
config: drop git_config_get_string_const() As evidenced by the leak fixes in the previous commit, the "const" in git_config_get_string_const() clearly misleads people into thinking that it does not allocate a copy of the string. We can fix this by renaming it, but it's easier still to just drop it. Of the four remaining callers: - The one in git_config_parse_expiry() still needs to allocate, since that's what its callers expect. We can just use the non-const version and cast our pointer. Slightly ugly, but the damage is contained in one spot. - The two in apply are writing to global "const char *" variables, and need to continue allocating. We often mark these as const because we assign default string literals to them. But in this case we don't do that, so we can just declare them as real "char *" pointers and use the non-const version. - The call in checkout doesn't actually need a copy; it can just use the non-allocating "tmp" version of the function. The function is also mentioned in the MyFirstContribution document. We can swap that call out for the non-allocating "tmp" variant, which fits well in the example given. We'll drop the "configset" and "repo" variants, as well (which are unused). Note that this frees up the "const" name, so we could rename the "tmp" variant back to that. But let's give some time for topics in flight to adapt to the new code before doing so (if we do it too soon, the function semantics will change but the compiler won't alert us). Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
char *apply_default_whitespace;
char *apply_default_ignorewhitespace;
const char *git_attributes_file;
const char *git_hooks_path;
Custom compression levels for objects and packs Add config variables pack.compression and core.loosecompression , and switch --compression=level to pack-objects. Loose objects will be compressed using core.loosecompression if set, else core.compression if set, else Z_BEST_SPEED. Packed objects will be compressed using --compression=level if seen, else pack.compression if set, else core.compression if set, else Z_DEFAULT_COMPRESSION. This is the "pack compression level". Loose objects added to a pack undeltified will be recompressed to the pack compression level if it is unequal to the current loose compression level by the preceding rules, or if the loose object was written while core.legacyheaders = true. Newly deltified loose objects are always compressed to the current pack compression level. Previously packed objects added to a pack are recompressed to the current pack compression level exactly when their deltification status changes, since the previous pack data cannot be reused. In either case, the --no-reuse-object switch from the first patch below will always force recompression to the current pack compression level, instead of assuming the pack compression level hasn't changed and pack data can be reused when possible. This applies on top of the following patches from Nicolas Pitre: [PATCH] allow for undeltified objects not to be reused [PATCH] make "repack -f" imply "pack-objects --no-reuse-object" Signed-off-by: Dana L. How <danahow@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
int zlib_compression_level = Z_BEST_SPEED;
int pack_compression_level = Z_DEFAULT_COMPRESSION;
int fsync_object_files = -1;
int use_fsync = -1;
enum fsync_method fsync_method = FSYNC_METHOD_DEFAULT;
enum fsync_component fsync_components = FSYNC_COMPONENTS_DEFAULT;
size_t packed_git_window_size = DEFAULT_PACKED_GIT_WINDOW_SIZE;
size_t packed_git_limit = DEFAULT_PACKED_GIT_LIMIT;
size_t delta_base_cache_limit = 96 * 1024 * 1024;
unsigned long big_file_threshold = 512 * 1024 * 1024;
int pager_use_color = 1;
const char *editor_program;
const char *askpass_program;
const char *excludes_file;
enum auto_crlf auto_crlf = AUTO_CRLF_FALSE;
int read_replace_refs = 1;
enum eol core_eol = EOL_UNSET;
int global_conv_flags_eol = CONV_EOL_RNDTRP_WARN;
char *check_roundtrip_encoding = "SHIFT-JIS";
unsigned whitespace_rule_cfg = WS_DEFAULT_RULE;
enum branch_track git_branch_track = BRANCH_TRACK_REMOTE;
enum rebase_setup_type autorebase = AUTOREBASE_NEVER;
push: Provide situational hints for non-fast-forward errors Pushing a non-fast-forward update to a remote repository will result in an error, but the hint text doesn't provide the correct resolution in every case. Give better resolution advice in three push scenarios: 1) If you push your current branch and it triggers a non-fast-forward error, you should merge remote changes with 'git pull' before pushing again. 2) If you push to a shared repository others push to, and your local tracking branches are not kept up to date, the 'matching refs' default will generate non-fast-forward errors on outdated branches. If this is your workflow, the 'matching refs' default is not for you. Consider setting the 'push.default' configuration variable to 'current' or 'upstream' to ensure only your current branch is pushed. 3) If you explicitly specify a ref that is not your current branch or push matching branches with ':', you will generate a non-fast-forward error if any pushed branch tip is out of date. You should checkout the offending branch and merge remote changes before pushing again. Teach transport.c to recognize these scenarios and configure push.c to hint for them. If 'git push's default behavior changes or we discover more scenarios, extension is easy. Standardize on the advice API and add three new advice variables, 'pushNonFFCurrent', 'pushNonFFDefault', and 'pushNonFFMatching'. Setting any of these to 'false' will disable their affiliated advice. Setting 'pushNonFastForward' to false will disable all three, thus preserving the config option for users who already set it, but guaranteeing new users won't disable push advice accidentally. Based-on-patch-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> Signed-off-by: Christopher Tiwald <christiwald@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
enum push_default_type push_default = PUSH_DEFAULT_UNSPECIFIED;
#ifndef OBJECT_CREATION_MODE
#define OBJECT_CREATION_MODE OBJECT_CREATION_USES_HARDLINKS
#endif
enum object_creation_mode object_creation_mode = OBJECT_CREATION_MODE;
char *notes_ref_name;
int grafts_replace_parents = 1;
int core_apply_sparse_checkout;
int core_sparse_checkout_cone;
repo_read_index: add config to expect files outside sparse patterns Typically with sparse checkouts, we expect files outside the sparsity patterns to be marked as SKIP_WORKTREE and be missing from the working tree. Sometimes this expectation would be violated however; including in cases such as: * users grabbing files from elsewhere and writing them to the worktree (perhaps by editing a cached copy in an editor, copying/renaming, or even untarring) * various git commands having incomplete or no support for the SKIP_WORKTREE bit[1,2] * users attempting to "abort" a sparse-checkout operation with a not-so-early Ctrl+C (updating $GIT_DIR/info/sparse-checkout and the working tree is not atomic)[3]. When the SKIP_WORKTREE bit in the index did not reflect the presence of the file in the working tree, it traditionally caused confusion and was difficult to detect and recover from. So, in a sparse checkout, since af6a51875a (repo_read_index: clear SKIP_WORKTREE bit from files present in worktree, 2022-01-14), Git automatically clears the SKIP_WORKTREE bit at index read time for entries corresponding to files that are present in the working tree. There is another workflow, however, where it is expected that paths outside the sparsity patterns appear to exist in the working tree and that they do not lose the SKIP_WORKTREE bit, at least until they get modified. A Git-aware virtual file system[4] takes advantage of its position as a file system driver to expose all files in the working tree, fetch them on demand using partial clone on access, and tell Git to pay attention to them on demand by updating the sparse checkout pattern on writes. This means that commands like "git status" only have to examine files that have potentially been modified, whereas commands like "ls" are able to show the entire codebase without requiring manual updates to the sparse checkout pattern. Thus since af6a51875a, Git with such Git-aware virtual file systems unsets the SKIP_WORKTREE bit for all files and commands like "git status" have to fetch and examine them all. Introduce a configuration setting sparse.expectFilesOutsideOfPatterns to allow limiting the tracked set of files to a small set once again. A Git-aware virtual file system or other application that wants to maintain files outside of the sparse checkout can set this in a repository to instruct Git not to check for the presence of SKIP_WORKTREE files. The setting defaults to false, so most users of sparse checkout will still get the benefit of an automatically updating index to recover from the variety of difficult issues detailed in af6a51875a for paths with SKIP_WORKTREE set despite the path being present. [1] https://lore.kernel.org/git/xmqqbmb1a7ga.fsf@gitster-ct.c.googlers.com/ [2] The three long paragraphs in the middle of https://lore.kernel.org/git/CABPp-BH9tju7WVm=QZDOvaMDdZbpNXrVWQdN-jmfN8wC6YVhmw@mail.gmail.com/ [3] https://lore.kernel.org/git/CABPp-BFnFpzwGC11TLoLs8YK5yiisA5D5-fFjXnJsbESVDwZsA@mail.gmail.com/ [4] such as the vfsd described in https://lore.kernel.org/git/20220207190320.2960362-1-jonathantanmy@google.com/ Signed-off-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Elijah Newren <newren@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
7 months ago
int sparse_expect_files_outside_of_patterns;
int merge_log_config = -1;
git on Mac OS and precomposed unicode Mac OS X mangles file names containing unicode on file systems HFS+, VFAT or SAMBA. When a file using unicode code points outside ASCII is created on a HFS+ drive, the file name is converted into decomposed unicode and written to disk. No conversion is done if the file name is already decomposed unicode. Calling open("\xc3\x84", ...) with a precomposed "Ä" yields the same result as open("\x41\xcc\x88",...) with a decomposed "Ä". As a consequence, readdir() returns the file names in decomposed unicode, even if the user expects precomposed unicode. Unlike on HFS+, Mac OS X stores files on a VFAT drive (e.g. an USB drive) in precomposed unicode, but readdir() still returns file names in decomposed unicode. When a git repository is stored on a network share using SAMBA, file names are send over the wire and written to disk on the remote system in precomposed unicode, but Mac OS X readdir() returns decomposed unicode to be compatible with its behaviour on HFS+ and VFAT. The unicode decomposition causes many problems: - The names "git add" and other commands get from the end user may often be precomposed form (the decomposed form is not easily input from the keyboard), but when the commands read from the filesystem to see what it is going to update the index with already is on the filesystem, readdir() will give decomposed form, which is different. - Similarly "git log", "git mv" and all other commands that need to compare pathnames found on the command line (often but not always precomposed form; a command line input resulting from globbing may be in decomposed) with pathnames found in the tree objects (should be precomposed form to be compatible with other systems and for consistency in general). - The same for names stored in the index, which should be precomposed, that may need to be compared with the names read from readdir(). NFS mounted from Linux is fully transparent and does not suffer from the above. As Mac OS X treats precomposed and decomposed file names as equal, we can - wrap readdir() on Mac OS X to return the precomposed form, and - normalize decomposed form given from the command line also to the precomposed form, to ensure that all pathnames used in Git are always in the precomposed form. This behaviour can be requested by setting "core.precomposedunicode" configuration variable to true. The code in compat/precomposed_utf8.c implements basically 4 new functions: precomposed_utf8_opendir(), precomposed_utf8_readdir(), precomposed_utf8_closedir() and precompose_argv(). The first three are to wrap opendir(3), readdir(3), and closedir(3) functions. The argv[] conversion allows to use the TAB filename completion done by the shell on command line. It tolerates other tools which use readdir() to feed decomposed file names into git. When creating a new git repository with "git init" or "git clone", "core.precomposedunicode" will be set "false". The user needs to activate this feature manually. She typically sets core.precomposedunicode to "true" on HFS and VFAT, or file systems mounted via SAMBA. Helped-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> Signed-off-by: Torsten Bögershausen <tboegi@web.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
10 years ago
int precomposed_unicode = -1; /* see probe_utf8_pathname_composition() */
unsigned long pack_size_limit_cfg;
enum log_refs_config log_all_ref_updates = LOG_REFS_UNSET;
#ifndef PROTECT_HFS_DEFAULT
#define PROTECT_HFS_DEFAULT 0
#endif
int protect_hfs = PROTECT_HFS_DEFAULT;
#ifndef PROTECT_NTFS_DEFAULT
protect_ntfs: turn on NTFS protection by default Back in the DOS days, in the FAT file system, file names always consisted of a base name of length 8 plus a file extension of length 3. Shorter file names were simply padded with spaces to the full 8.3 format. Later, the FAT file system was taught to support _also_ longer names, with an 8.3 "short name" as primary file name. While at it, the same facility allowed formerly illegal file names, such as `.git` (empty base names were not allowed), which would have the "short name" `git~1` associated with it. For backwards-compatibility, NTFS supports alternative 8.3 short filenames, too, even if starting with Windows Vista, they are only generated on the system drive by default. We addressed the problem that the `.git/` directory can _also_ be accessed via `git~1/` (when short names are enabled) in 2b4c6efc821 (read-cache: optionally disallow NTFS .git variants, 2014-12-16), i.e. since Git v1.9.5, by introducing the config setting `core.protectNTFS` and enabling it by default on Windows. In the meantime, Windows 10 introduced the "Windows Subsystem for Linux" (short: WSL), i.e. a way to run Linux applications/distributions in a thinly-isolated subsystem on Windows (giving rise to many a "2016 is the Year of Linux on the Desktop" jokes). WSL is getting increasingly popular, also due to the painless way Linux application can operate directly ("natively") on files on Windows' file system: the Windows drives are mounted automatically (e.g. `C:` as `/mnt/c/`). Taken together, this means that we now have to enable the safe-guards of Git v1.9.5 also in WSL: it is possible to access a `.git` directory inside `/mnt/c/` via the 8.3 name `git~1` (unless short name generation was disabled manually). Since regular Linux distributions run in WSL, this means we have to enable `core.protectNTFS` at least on Linux, too. To enable Services for Macintosh in Windows NT to store so-called resource forks, NTFS introduced "Alternate Data Streams". Essentially, these constitute additional metadata that are connected to (and copied with) their associated files, and they are accessed via pseudo file names of the form `filename:<stream-name>:<stream-type>`. In a recent patch, we extended `core.protectNTFS` to also protect against accesses via NTFS Alternate Data Streams, e.g. to prevent contents of the `.git/` directory to be "tracked" via yet another alternative file name. While it is not possible (at least by default) to access files via NTFS Alternate Data Streams from within WSL, the defaults on macOS when mounting network shares via SMB _do_ allow accessing files and directories in that way. Therefore, we need to enable `core.protectNTFS` on macOS by default, too, and really, on any Operating System that can mount network shares via SMB/CIFS. A couple of approaches were considered for fixing this: 1. We could perform a dynamic NTFS check similar to the `core.symlinks` check in `init`/`clone`: instead of trying to create a symbolic link in the `.git/` directory, we could create a test file and try to access `.git/config` via 8.3 name and/or Alternate Data Stream. 2. We could simply "flip the switch" on `core.protectNTFS`, to make it "on by default". The obvious downside of 1. is that it won't protect worktrees that were clone with a vulnerable Git version already. We considered patching code paths that check out files to check whether we're running on an NTFS system dynamically and persist the result in the repository-local config setting `core.protectNTFS`, but in the end decided that this solution would be too fragile, and too involved. The obvious downside of 2. is that everybody will have to "suffer" the performance penalty incurred from calling `is_ntfs_dotgit()` on every path, even in setups where. After the recent work to accelerate `is_ntfs_dotgit()` in most cases, it looks as if the time spent on validating ten million random file names increases only negligibly (less than 20ms, well within the standard deviation of ~50ms). Therefore the benefits outweigh the cost. Another downside of this is that paths that might have been acceptable previously now will be forbidden. Realistically, though, this is an improvement because public Git hosters already would reject any `git push` that contains such file names. Note: There might be a similar problem mounting HFS+ on Linux. However, this scenario has been considered unlikely and in light of the cost (in the aforementioned benchmark, `core.protectHFS = true` increased the time from ~440ms to ~610ms), it was decided _not_ to touch the default of `core.protectHFS`. This change addresses CVE-2019-1353. Reported-by: Nicolas Joly <Nicolas.Joly@microsoft.com> Helped-by: Garima Singh <garima.singh@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de>
3 years ago
#define PROTECT_NTFS_DEFAULT 1
#endif
int protect_ntfs = PROTECT_NTFS_DEFAULT;
/*
* The character that begins a commented line in user-editable file
* that is subject to stripspace.
*/
char comment_line_char = '#';
int auto_comment_line_char;
/* Parallel index stat data preload? */
int core_preload_index = 1;
Clean up work-tree handling The old version of work-tree support was an unholy mess, barely readable, and not to the point. For example, why do you have to provide a worktree, when it is not used? As in "git status". Now it works. Another riddle was: if you can have work trees inside the git dir, why are some programs complaining that they need a work tree? IOW it is allowed to call $ git --git-dir=../ --work-tree=. bla when you really want to. In this case, you are both in the git directory and in the working tree. So, programs have to actually test for the right thing, namely if they are inside a working tree, and not if they are inside a git directory. Also, GIT_DIR=../.git should behave the same as if no GIT_DIR was specified, unless there is a repository in the current working directory. It does now. The logic to determine if a repository is bare, or has a work tree (tertium non datur), is this: --work-tree=bla overrides GIT_WORK_TREE, which overrides core.bare = true, which overrides core.worktree, which overrides GIT_DIR/.. when GIT_DIR ends in /.git, which overrides the directory in which .git/ was found. In related news, a long standing bug was fixed: when in .git/bla/x.git/, which is a bare repository, git formerly assumed ../.. to be the appropriate git dir. This problem was reported by Shawn Pearce to have caused much pain, where a colleague mistakenly ran "git init" in "/" a long time ago, and bare repositories just would not work. Signed-off-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
15 years ago
/* This is set by setup_git_dir_gently() and/or git_default_config() */
char *git_work_tree_cfg;
static char *git_namespace;
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
static char *super_prefix;
/*
* Repository-local GIT_* environment variables; see cache.h for details.
*/
const char * const local_repo_env[] = {
ALTERNATE_DB_ENVIRONMENT,
CONFIG_ENVIRONMENT,
CONFIG_DATA_ENVIRONMENT,
CONFIG_COUNT_ENVIRONMENT,
DB_ENVIRONMENT,
GIT_DIR_ENVIRONMENT,
GIT_WORK_TREE_ENVIRONMENT,
setup: suppress implicit "." work-tree for bare repos If an explicit GIT_DIR is given without a working tree, we implicitly assume that the current working directory should be used as the working tree. E.g.,: GIT_DIR=/some/repo.git git status would compare against the cwd. Unfortunately, we fool this rule for sub-invocations of git by setting GIT_DIR internally ourselves. For example: git init foo cd foo/.git git status ;# fails, as we expect git config alias.st status git status ;# does not fail, but should What happens is that we run setup_git_directory when doing alias lookup (since we need to see the config), set GIT_DIR as a result, and then leave GIT_WORK_TREE blank (because we do not have one). Then when we actually run the status command, we do setup_git_directory again, which sees our explicit GIT_DIR and uses the cwd as an implicit worktree. It's tempting to argue that we should be suppressing that second invocation of setup_git_directory, as it could use the values we already found in memory. However, the problem still exists for sub-processes (e.g., if "git status" were an external command). You can see another example with the "--bare" option, which sets GIT_DIR explicitly. For example: git init foo cd foo/.git git status ;# fails git --bare status ;# does NOT fail We need some way of telling sub-processes "even though GIT_DIR is set, do not use cwd as an implicit working tree". We could do it by putting a special token into GIT_WORK_TREE, but the obvious choice (an empty string) has some portability problems. Instead, we add a new boolean variable, GIT_IMPLICIT_WORK_TREE, which suppresses the use of cwd as a working tree when GIT_DIR is set. We trigger the new variable when we know we are in a bare setting. The variable is left intentionally undocumented, as this is an internal detail (for now, anyway). If somebody comes up with a good alternate use for it, and once we are confident we have shaken any bugs out of it, we can consider promoting it further. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
10 years ago
GIT_IMPLICIT_WORK_TREE_ENVIRONMENT,
GRAFT_ENVIRONMENT,
INDEX_ENVIRONMENT,
NO_REPLACE_OBJECTS_ENVIRONMENT,
GIT_REPLACE_REF_BASE_ENVIRONMENT,
GIT_PREFIX_ENVIRONMENT,
GIT_SUPER_PREFIX_ENVIRONMENT,
GIT_SHALLOW_FILE_ENVIRONMENT,
$GIT_COMMON_DIR: a new environment variable This variable is intended to support multiple working directories attached to a repository. Such a repository may have a main working directory, created by either "git init" or "git clone" and one or more linked working directories. These working directories and the main repository share the same repository directory. In linked working directories, $GIT_COMMON_DIR must be defined to point to the real repository directory and $GIT_DIR points to an unused subdirectory inside $GIT_COMMON_DIR. File locations inside the repository are reorganized from the linked worktree view point: - worktree-specific such as HEAD, logs/HEAD, index, other top-level refs and unrecognized files are from $GIT_DIR. - the rest like objects, refs, info, hooks, packed-refs, shallow... are from $GIT_COMMON_DIR (except info/sparse-checkout, but that's a separate patch) Scripts are supposed to retrieve paths in $GIT_DIR with "git rev-parse --git-path", which will take care of "$GIT_DIR vs $GIT_COMMON_DIR" business. The redirection is done by git_path(), git_pathdup() and strbuf_git_path(). The selected list of paths goes to $GIT_COMMON_DIR, not the other way around in case a developer adds a new worktree-specific file and it's accidentally promoted to be shared across repositories (this includes unknown files added by third party commands) The list of known files that belong to $GIT_DIR are: ADD_EDIT.patch BISECT_ANCESTORS_OK BISECT_EXPECTED_REV BISECT_LOG BISECT_NAMES CHERRY_PICK_HEAD COMMIT_MSG FETCH_HEAD HEAD MERGE_HEAD MERGE_MODE MERGE_RR NOTES_EDITMSG NOTES_MERGE_WORKTREE ORIG_HEAD REVERT_HEAD SQUASH_MSG TAG_EDITMSG fast_import_crash_* logs/HEAD next-index-* rebase-apply rebase-merge rsync-refs-* sequencer/* shallow_* Path mapping is NOT done for git_path_submodule(). Multi-checkouts are not supported as submodules. Helped-by: Jens Lehmann <Jens.Lehmann@web.de> Signed-off-by: Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy <pclouds@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
8 years ago
GIT_COMMON_DIR_ENVIRONMENT,
NULL
};
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
static char *expand_namespace(const char *raw_namespace)
{
struct strbuf buf = STRBUF_INIT;
struct strbuf **components, **c;
if (!raw_namespace || !*raw_namespace)
return xstrdup("");
strbuf_addstr(&buf, raw_namespace);
components = strbuf_split(&buf, '/');
strbuf_reset(&buf);
for (c = components; *c; c++)
if (strcmp((*c)->buf, "/") != 0)
strbuf_addf(&buf, "refs/namespaces/%s", (*c)->buf);
strbuf_list_free(components);
if (check_refname_format(buf.buf, 0))
die(_("bad git namespace path \"%s\""), raw_namespace);
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
strbuf_addch(&buf, '/');
return strbuf_detach(&buf, NULL);
}
const char *getenv_safe(struct strvec *argv, const char *name)
{
const char *value = getenv(name);
if (!value)
return NULL;
strvec_push(argv, value);
return argv->v[argv->nr - 1];
}
void setup_git_env(const char *git_dir)
{
char *git_replace_ref_base;
const char *shallow_file;
const char *replace_ref_base;
struct set_gitdir_args args = { NULL };
struct strvec to_free = STRVEC_INIT;
args.commondir = getenv_safe(&to_free, GIT_COMMON_DIR_ENVIRONMENT);
args.object_dir = getenv_safe(&to_free, DB_ENVIRONMENT);
args.graft_file = getenv_safe(&to_free, GRAFT_ENVIRONMENT);
args.index_file = getenv_safe(&to_free, INDEX_ENVIRONMENT);
args.alternate_db = getenv_safe(&to_free, ALTERNATE_DB_ENVIRONMENT);
if (getenv(GIT_QUARANTINE_ENVIRONMENT)) {
args.disable_ref_updates = 1;
}
repo_set_gitdir(the_repository, git_dir, &args);
strvec_clear(&to_free);
if (getenv(NO_REPLACE_OBJECTS_ENVIRONMENT))
read_replace_refs = 0;
replace_ref_base = getenv(GIT_REPLACE_REF_BASE_ENVIRONMENT);
git_replace_ref_base = xstrdup(replace_ref_base ? replace_ref_base
: "refs/replace/");
update_ref_namespace(NAMESPACE_REPLACE, git_replace_ref_base);
free(git_namespace);
git_namespace = expand_namespace(getenv(GIT_NAMESPACE_ENVIRONMENT));
shallow_file = getenv(GIT_SHALLOW_FILE_ENVIRONMENT);
if (shallow_file)
set_alternate_shallow_file(the_repository, shallow_file, 0);
}
int is_bare_repository(void)
{
Clean up work-tree handling The old version of work-tree support was an unholy mess, barely readable, and not to the point. For example, why do you have to provide a worktree, when it is not used? As in "git status". Now it works. Another riddle was: if you can have work trees inside the git dir, why are some programs complaining that they need a work tree? IOW it is allowed to call $ git --git-dir=../ --work-tree=. bla when you really want to. In this case, you are both in the git directory and in the working tree. So, programs have to actually test for the right thing, namely if they are inside a working tree, and not if they are inside a git directory. Also, GIT_DIR=../.git should behave the same as if no GIT_DIR was specified, unless there is a repository in the current working directory. It does now. The logic to determine if a repository is bare, or has a work tree (tertium non datur), is this: --work-tree=bla overrides GIT_WORK_TREE, which overrides core.bare = true, which overrides core.worktree, which overrides GIT_DIR/.. when GIT_DIR ends in /.git, which overrides the directory in which .git/ was found. In related news, a long standing bug was fixed: when in .git/bla/x.git/, which is a bare repository, git formerly assumed ../.. to be the appropriate git dir. This problem was reported by Shawn Pearce to have caused much pain, where a colleague mistakenly ran "git init" in "/" a long time ago, and bare repositories just would not work. Signed-off-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
15 years ago
/* if core.bare is not 'false', let's see if there is a work tree */
return is_bare_repository_cfg && !get_git_work_tree();
}
config: only read .git/config from configured repos When git_config() runs, it looks in the system, user-wide, and repo-level config files. It gets the latter by calling git_pathdup(), which in turn calls get_git_dir(). If we haven't set up the git repository yet, this may simply return ".git", and we will look at ".git/config". This seems like it would be helpful (presumably we haven't set up the repository yet, so it tries to find it), but it turns out to be a bad idea for a few reasons: - it's not sufficient, and therefore hides bugs in a confusing way. Config will be respected if commands are run from the top-level of the working tree, but not from a subdirectory. - it's not always true that we haven't set up the repository _yet_; we may not want to do it at all. For instance, if you run "git init /some/path" from inside another repository, it should not load config from the existing repository. - there might be a path ".git/config", but it is not the actual repository we would find via setup_git_directory(). This may happen, e.g., if you are storing a git repository inside another git repository, but have munged one of the files in such a way that the inner repository is not valid (e.g., by removing HEAD). We have at least two bugs of the second type in git-init, introduced by ae5f677 (lazily load core.sharedrepository, 2016-03-11). It causes init to use git_configset(), which loads all of the config, including values from the current repo (if any). This shows up in two ways: 1. If we happen to be in an existing repository directory, we'll read and respect core.sharedrepository from it, even though it should have no bearing on the new repository. A new test in t1301 covers this. 2. Similarly, if we're in an existing repo that sets core.logallrefupdates, that will cause init to fail to set it in a newly created repository (because it thinks that the user's templates already did so). A new test in t0001 covers this. We also need to adjust an existing test in t1302, which gives another example of why this patch is an improvement. That test creates an embedded repository with a bogus core.repositoryformatversion of "99". It wants to make sure that we actually stop at the bogus repo rather than continuing upward to find the outer repo. So it checks that "git config core.repositoryformatversion" returns 99. But that only works because we blindly read ".git/config", even though we _know_ we're in a repository whose vintage we do not understand. After this patch, we avoid reading config from the unknown vintage repository at all, which is a safer choice. But we need to tweak the test, since core.repositoryformatversion will not return 99; it will claim that it could not find the variable at all. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
6 years ago
int have_git_dir(void)
{
return startup_info->have_repository
|| the_repository->gitdir;
config: only read .git/config from configured repos When git_config() runs, it looks in the system, user-wide, and repo-level config files. It gets the latter by calling git_pathdup(), which in turn calls get_git_dir(). If we haven't set up the git repository yet, this may simply return ".git", and we will look at ".git/config". This seems like it would be helpful (presumably we haven't set up the repository yet, so it tries to find it), but it turns out to be a bad idea for a few reasons: - it's not sufficient, and therefore hides bugs in a confusing way. Config will be respected if commands are run from the top-level of the working tree, but not from a subdirectory. - it's not always true that we haven't set up the repository _yet_; we may not want to do it at all. For instance, if you run "git init /some/path" from inside another repository, it should not load config from the existing repository. - there might be a path ".git/config", but it is not the actual repository we would find via setup_git_directory(). This may happen, e.g., if you are storing a git repository inside another git repository, but have munged one of the files in such a way that the inner repository is not valid (e.g., by removing HEAD). We have at least two bugs of the second type in git-init, introduced by ae5f677 (lazily load core.sharedrepository, 2016-03-11). It causes init to use git_configset(), which loads all of the config, including values from the current repo (if any). This shows up in two ways: 1. If we happen to be in an existing repository directory, we'll read and respect core.sharedrepository from it, even though it should have no bearing on the new repository. A new test in t1301 covers this. 2. Similarly, if we're in an existing repo that sets core.logallrefupdates, that will cause init to fail to set it in a newly created repository (because it thinks that the user's templates already did so). A new test in t0001 covers this. We also need to adjust an existing test in t1302, which gives another example of why this patch is an improvement. That test creates an embedded repository with a bogus core.repositoryformatversion of "99". It wants to make sure that we actually stop at the bogus repo rather than continuing upward to find the outer repo. So it checks that "git config core.repositoryformatversion" returns 99. But that only works because we blindly read ".git/config", even though we _know_ we're in a repository whose vintage we do not understand. After this patch, we avoid reading config from the unknown vintage repository at all, which is a safer choice. But we need to tweak the test, since core.repositoryformatversion will not return 99; it will claim that it could not find the variable at all. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
6 years ago
}
const char *get_git_dir(void)
{
if (!the_repository->gitdir)
BUG("git environment hasn't been setup");
return the_repository->gitdir;
}
$GIT_COMMON_DIR: a new environment variable This variable is intended to support multiple working directories attached to a repository. Such a repository may have a main working directory, created by either "git init" or "git clone" and one or more linked working directories. These working directories and the main repository share the same repository directory. In linked working directories, $GIT_COMMON_DIR must be defined to point to the real repository directory and $GIT_DIR points to an unused subdirectory inside $GIT_COMMON_DIR. File locations inside the repository are reorganized from the linked worktree view point: - worktree-specific such as HEAD, logs/HEAD, index, other top-level refs and unrecognized files are from $GIT_DIR. - the rest like objects, refs, info, hooks, packed-refs, shallow... are from $GIT_COMMON_DIR (except info/sparse-checkout, but that's a separate patch) Scripts are supposed to retrieve paths in $GIT_DIR with "git rev-parse --git-path", which will take care of "$GIT_DIR vs $GIT_COMMON_DIR" business. The redirection is done by git_path(), git_pathdup() and strbuf_git_path(). The selected list of paths goes to $GIT_COMMON_DIR, not the other way around in case a developer adds a new worktree-specific file and it's accidentally promoted to be shared across repositories (this includes unknown files added by third party commands) The list of known files that belong to $GIT_DIR are: ADD_EDIT.patch BISECT_ANCESTORS_OK BISECT_EXPECTED_REV BISECT_LOG BISECT_NAMES CHERRY_PICK_HEAD COMMIT_MSG FETCH_HEAD HEAD MERGE_HEAD MERGE_MODE MERGE_RR NOTES_EDITMSG NOTES_MERGE_WORKTREE ORIG_HEAD REVERT_HEAD SQUASH_MSG TAG_EDITMSG fast_import_crash_* logs/HEAD next-index-* rebase-apply rebase-merge rsync-refs-* sequencer/* shallow_* Path mapping is NOT done for git_path_submodule(). Multi-checkouts are not supported as submodules. Helped-by: Jens Lehmann <Jens.Lehmann@web.de> Signed-off-by: Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy <pclouds@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
8 years ago
const char *get_git_common_dir(void)
{
if (!the_repository->commondir)
BUG("git environment hasn't been setup");
return the_repository->commondir;
$GIT_COMMON_DIR: a new environment variable This variable is intended to support multiple working directories attached to a repository. Such a repository may have a main working directory, created by either "git init" or "git clone" and one or more linked working directories. These working directories and the main repository share the same repository directory. In linked working directories, $GIT_COMMON_DIR must be defined to point to the real repository directory and $GIT_DIR points to an unused subdirectory inside $GIT_COMMON_DIR. File locations inside the repository are reorganized from the linked worktree view point: - worktree-specific such as HEAD, logs/HEAD, index, other top-level refs and unrecognized files are from $GIT_DIR. - the rest like objects, refs, info, hooks, packed-refs, shallow... are from $GIT_COMMON_DIR (except info/sparse-checkout, but that's a separate patch) Scripts are supposed to retrieve paths in $GIT_DIR with "git rev-parse --git-path", which will take care of "$GIT_DIR vs $GIT_COMMON_DIR" business. The redirection is done by git_path(), git_pathdup() and strbuf_git_path(). The selected list of paths goes to $GIT_COMMON_DIR, not the other way around in case a developer adds a new worktree-specific file and it's accidentally promoted to be shared across repositories (this includes unknown files added by third party commands) The list of known files that belong to $GIT_DIR are: ADD_EDIT.patch BISECT_ANCESTORS_OK BISECT_EXPECTED_REV BISECT_LOG BISECT_NAMES CHERRY_PICK_HEAD COMMIT_MSG FETCH_HEAD HEAD MERGE_HEAD MERGE_MODE MERGE_RR NOTES_EDITMSG NOTES_MERGE_WORKTREE ORIG_HEAD REVERT_HEAD SQUASH_MSG TAG_EDITMSG fast_import_crash_* logs/HEAD next-index-* rebase-apply rebase-merge rsync-refs-* sequencer/* shallow_* Path mapping is NOT done for git_path_submodule(). Multi-checkouts are not supported as submodules. Helped-by: Jens Lehmann <Jens.Lehmann@web.de> Signed-off-by: Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy <pclouds@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
8 years ago
}
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
const char *get_git_namespace(void)
{
if (!git_namespace)
BUG("git environment hasn't been setup");
return git_namespace;
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
}
const char *strip_namespace(const char *namespaced_ref)
{
const char *out;
if (skip_prefix(namespaced_ref, get_git_namespace(), &out))
return out;
return NULL;
ref namespaces: infrastructure Add support for dividing the refs of a single repository into multiple namespaces, each of which can have its own branches, tags, and HEAD. Git can expose each namespace as an independent repository to pull from and push to, while sharing the object store, and exposing all the refs to operations such as git-gc. Storing multiple repositories as namespaces of a single repository avoids storing duplicate copies of the same objects, such as when storing multiple branches of the same source. The alternates mechanism provides similar support for avoiding duplicates, but alternates do not prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do. To specify a namespace, set the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable to the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding refs in a directory under refs/namespaces/. For example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/. You can also specify namespaces via the --namespace option to git. Note that namespaces which include a / will expand to a hierarchy of namespaces; for example, GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar will store refs under refs/namespaces/foo/refs/namespaces/bar/. This makes paths in GIT_NAMESPACE behave hierarchically, so that cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo/bar produces the same result as cloning with GIT_NAMESPACE=foo and cloning from that repo with GIT_NAMESPACE=bar. It also avoids ambiguity with strange namespace paths such as foo/refs/heads/, which could otherwise generate directory/file conflicts within the refs directory. Add the infrastructure for ref namespaces: handle the GIT_NAMESPACE environment variable and --namespace option, and support iterating over refs in a namespace. Signed-off-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Signed-off-by: Jamey Sharp <jamey@minilop.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
}
const char *get_super_prefix(void)
{
static int initialized;
if (!initialized) {
super_prefix = xstrdup_or_null(getenv(GIT_SUPER_PREFIX_ENVIRONMENT));
initialized = 1;
}
return super_prefix;
}
static int git_work_tree_initialized;
/*
* Note. This works only before you used a work tree. This was added
* primarily to support git-clone to work in a new repository it just
* created, and is not meant to flip between different work trees.
*/
void set_git_work_tree(const char *new_work_tree)
{
if (git_work_tree_initialized) {
struct strbuf realpath = STRBUF_INIT;
strbuf_realpath(&realpath, new_work_tree, 1);
new_work_tree = realpath.buf;
if (strcmp(new_work_tree, the_repository->worktree))
die("internal error: work tree has already been set\n"
"Current worktree: %s\nNew worktree: %s",
the_repository->worktree, new_work_tree);
strbuf_release(&realpath);
return;
}
git_work_tree_initialized = 1;
repo_set_worktree(the_repository, new_work_tree);
}
Clean up work-tree handling The old version of work-tree support was an unholy mess, barely readable, and not to the point. For example, why do you have to provide a worktree, when it is not used? As in "git status". Now it works. Another riddle was: if you can have work trees inside the git dir, why are some programs complaining that they need a work tree? IOW it is allowed to call $ git --git-dir=../ --work-tree=. bla when you really want to. In this case, you are both in the git directory and in the working tree. So, programs have to actually test for the right thing, namely if they are inside a working tree, and not if they are inside a git directory. Also, GIT_DIR=../.git should behave the same as if no GIT_DIR was specified, unless there is a repository in the current working directory. It does now. The logic to determine if a repository is bare, or has a work tree (tertium non datur), is this: --work-tree=bla overrides GIT_WORK_TREE, which overrides core.bare = true, which overrides core.worktree, which overrides GIT_DIR/.. when GIT_DIR ends in /.git, which overrides the directory in which .git/ was found. In related news, a long standing bug was fixed: when in .git/bla/x.git/, which is a bare repository, git formerly assumed ../.. to be the appropriate git dir. This problem was reported by Shawn Pearce to have caused much pain, where a colleague mistakenly ran "git init" in "/" a long time ago, and bare repositories just would not work. Signed-off-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
15 years ago
const char *get_git_work_tree(void)
{
return the_repository->worktree;
Clean up work-tree handling The old version of work-tree support was an unholy mess, barely readable, and not to the point. For example, why do you have to provide a worktree, when it is not used? As in "git status". Now it works. Another riddle was: if you can have work trees inside the git dir, why are some programs complaining that they need a work tree? IOW it is allowed to call $ git --git-dir=../ --work-tree=. bla when you really want to. In this case, you are both in the git directory and in the working tree. So, programs have to actually test for the right thing, namely if they are inside a working tree, and not if they are inside a git directory. Also, GIT_DIR=../.git should behave the same as if no GIT_DIR was specified, unless there is a repository in the current working directory. It does now. The logic to determine if a repository is bare, or has a work tree (tertium non datur), is this: --work-tree=bla overrides GIT_WORK_TREE, which overrides core.bare = true, which overrides core.worktree, which overrides GIT_DIR/.. when GIT_DIR ends in /.git, which overrides the directory in which .git/ was found. In related news, a long standing bug was fixed: when in .git/bla/x.git/, which is a bare repository, git formerly assumed ../.. to be the appropriate git dir. This problem was reported by Shawn Pearce to have caused much pain, where a colleague mistakenly ran "git init" in "/" a long time ago, and bare repositories just would not work. Signed-off-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
15 years ago
}
const char *get_object_directory(void)
{
sha1-file: use an object_directory for the main object dir Our handling of alternate object directories is needlessly different from the main object directory. As a result, many places in the code basically look like this: do_something(r->objects->objdir); for (odb = r->objects->alt_odb_list; odb; odb = odb->next) do_something(odb->path); That gets annoying when do_something() is non-trivial, and we've resorted to gross hacks like creating fake alternates (see find_short_object_filename()). Instead, let's give each raw_object_store a unified list of object_directory structs. The first will be the main store, and everything after is an alternate. Very few callers even care about the distinction, and can just loop over the whole list (and those who care can just treat the first element differently). A few observations: - we don't need r->objects->objectdir anymore, and can just mechanically convert that to r->objects->odb->path - object_directory's path field needs to become a real pointer rather than a FLEX_ARRAY, in order to fill it with expand_base_dir() - we'll call prepare_alt_odb() earlier in many functions (i.e., outside of the loop). This may result in us calling it even when our function would be satisfied looking only at the main odb. But this doesn't matter in practice. It's not a very expensive operation in the first place, and in the majority of cases it will be a noop. We call it already (and cache its results) in prepare_packed_git(), and we'll generally check packs before loose objects. So essentially every program is going to call it immediately once per program. Arguably we should just prepare_alt_odb() immediately upon setting up the repository's object directory, which would save us sprinkling calls throughout the code base (and forgetting to do so has been a source of subtle bugs in the past). But I've stopped short of that here, since there are already a lot of other moving parts in this patch. - Most call sites just get shorter. The check_and_freshen() functions are an exception, because they have entry points to handle local and nonlocal directories separately. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 years ago
if (!the_repository->objects->odb)
BUG("git environment hasn't been setup");
sha1-file: use an object_directory for the main object dir Our handling of alternate object directories is needlessly different from the main object directory. As a result, many places in the code basically look like this: do_something(r->objects->objdir); for (odb = r->objects->alt_odb_list; odb; odb = odb->next) do_something(odb->path); That gets annoying when do_something() is non-trivial, and we've resorted to gross hacks like creating fake alternates (see find_short_object_filename()). Instead, let's give each raw_object_store a unified list of object_directory structs. The first will be the main store, and everything after is an alternate. Very few callers even care about the distinction, and can just loop over the whole list (and those who care can just treat the first element differently). A few observations: - we don't need r->objects->objectdir anymore, and can just mechanically convert that to r->objects->odb->path - object_directory's path field needs to become a real pointer rather than a FLEX_ARRAY, in order to fill it with expand_base_dir() - we'll call prepare_alt_odb() earlier in many functions (i.e., outside of the loop). This may result in us calling it even when our function would be satisfied looking only at the main odb. But this doesn't matter in practice. It's not a very expensive operation in the first place, and in the majority of cases it will be a noop. We call it already (and cache its results) in prepare_packed_git(), and we'll generally check packs before loose objects. So essentially every program is going to call it immediately once per program. Arguably we should just prepare_alt_odb() immediately upon setting up the repository's object directory, which would save us sprinkling calls throughout the code base (and forgetting to do so has been a source of subtle bugs in the past). But I've stopped short of that here, since there are already a lot of other moving parts in this patch. - Most call sites just get shorter. The check_and_freshen() functions are an exception, because they have entry points to handle local and nonlocal directories separately. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
4 years ago
return the_repository->objects->odb->path;
}
int odb_mkstemp(struct strbuf *temp_filename, const char *pattern)
{
int fd;
/*
* we let the umask do its job, don't try to be more
* restrictive except to remove write permission.
*/
int mode = 0444;
git_path_buf(temp_filename, "objects/%s", pattern);
fd = git_mkstemp_mode(temp_filename->buf, mode);
if (0 <= fd)
return fd;
/* slow path */
/* some mkstemp implementations erase temp_filename on failure */
git_path_buf(temp_filename, "objects/%s", pattern);
safe_create_leading_directories(temp_filename->buf);
return xmkstemp_mode(temp_filename->buf, mode);
}
int odb_pack_keep(const char *name)
{
int fd;
fd = open(name, O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0600);
if (0 <= fd)
return fd;
/* slow path */
safe_create_leading_directories_const(name);
return open(name, O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0600);
}
char *get_index_file(void)
{
if (!the_repository->index_file)
BUG("git environment hasn't been setup");
return the_repository->index_file;
}
char *get_graft_file(struct repository *r)
{
if (!r->graft_file)
BUG("git environment hasn't been setup");
return r->graft_file;
}
set_work_tree: use chdir_notify When we change to the top of the working tree, we manually re-adjust $GIT_DIR and call set_git_dir() again, in order to update any relative git-dir we'd compute earlier. Instead of the work-tree code having to know to call the git-dir code, let's use the new chdir_notify interface. There are two spots that need updating, with a few subtleties in each: 1. the set_git_dir() code needs to chdir_notify_register() so it can be told when to update its path. Technically we could push this down into repo_set_gitdir(), so that even repository structs besides the_repository could benefit from this. But that opens up a lot of complications: - we'd still need to touch set_git_dir(), because it does some other setup (like setting $GIT_DIR in the environment) - submodules using other repository structs get cleaned up, which means we'd need to remove them from the chdir_notify list - it's unlikely to fix any bugs, since we shouldn't generally chdir() in the middle of working on a submodule 2. setup_work_tree now needs to call chdir_notify(), and can lose its manual set_git_dir() call. Note that at first glance it looks like this undoes the absolute-to-relative optimization added by 044bbbcb63 (Make git_dir a path relative to work_tree in setup_work_tree(), 2008-06-19). But for the most part that optimization was just _undoing_ the relative-to-absolute conversion which the function was doing earlier (and which is now gone). It is true that if you already have an absolute git_dir that the setup_work_tree() function will no longer make it relative as a side effect. But: - we generally do have relative git-dir's due to the way the discovery code works - if we really care about making git-dir's relative when possible, then we should be relativizing them earlier (e.g., when we see an absolute $GIT_DIR we could turn it relative, whether we are going to chdir into a worktree or not). That would cover all cases, including ones that 044bbbcb63 did not. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
static void set_git_dir_1(const char *path)
{
wrapper.c: add x{un,}setenv(), and use xsetenv() in environment.c Add fatal wrappers for setenv() and unsetenv(). In d7ac12b25d3 (Add set_git_dir() function, 2007-08-01) we started checking its return value, and since 48988c4d0c3 (set_git_dir: die when setenv() fails, 2018-03-30) we've had set_git_dir_1() die if we couldn't set it. Let's provide a wrapper for both, this will be useful in many other places, a subsequent patch will make another use of xsetenv(). The checking of the return value here is over-eager according to setenv(3) and POSIX. It's documented as returning just -1 or 0, so perhaps we should be checking -1 explicitly. Let's just instead die on any non-zero, if our C library is so broken as to return something else than -1 on error (and perhaps not set errno?) the worst we'll do is die with a nonsensical errno value, but we'll want to die in either case. Let's make these return "void" instead of "int". As far as I can tell there's no other x*() wrappers that needed to make the decision of deviating from the signature in the C library, but since their return value is only used to indicate errors (so we'd die here), we can catch unreachable code such as if (xsetenv(...) < 0) [...]; I think it would be OK skip the NULL check of the "name" here for the calls to die_errno(). Almost all of our setenv() callers are taking a constant string hardcoded in the source as the first argument, and for the rest we can probably assume they've done the NULL check themselves. Even if they didn't, modern C libraries are forgiving about it (e.g. glibc formatting it as "(null)"), on those that aren't, well, we were about to die anyway. But let's include the check anyway for good measure. 1. https://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009604499/functions/setenv.html Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
1 year ago
xsetenv(GIT_DIR_ENVIRONMENT, path, 1);
setup_git_env(path);
}
static void update_relative_gitdir(const char *name UNUSED,
set_work_tree: use chdir_notify When we change to the top of the working tree, we manually re-adjust $GIT_DIR and call set_git_dir() again, in order to update any relative git-dir we'd compute earlier. Instead of the work-tree code having to know to call the git-dir code, let's use the new chdir_notify interface. There are two spots that need updating, with a few subtleties in each: 1. the set_git_dir() code needs to chdir_notify_register() so it can be told when to update its path. Technically we could push this down into repo_set_gitdir(), so that even repository structs besides the_repository could benefit from this. But that opens up a lot of complications: - we'd still need to touch set_git_dir(), because it does some other setup (like setting $GIT_DIR in the environment) - submodules using other repository structs get cleaned up, which means we'd need to remove them from the chdir_notify list - it's unlikely to fix any bugs, since we shouldn't generally chdir() in the middle of working on a submodule 2. setup_work_tree now needs to call chdir_notify(), and can lose its manual set_git_dir() call. Note that at first glance it looks like this undoes the absolute-to-relative optimization added by 044bbbcb63 (Make git_dir a path relative to work_tree in setup_work_tree(), 2008-06-19). But for the most part that optimization was just _undoing_ the relative-to-absolute conversion which the function was doing earlier (and which is now gone). It is true that if you already have an absolute git_dir that the setup_work_tree() function will no longer make it relative as a side effect. But: - we generally do have relative git-dir's due to the way the discovery code works - if we really care about making git-dir's relative when possible, then we should be relativizing them earlier (e.g., when we see an absolute $GIT_DIR we could turn it relative, whether we are going to chdir into a worktree or not). That would cover all cases, including ones that 044bbbcb63 did not. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
const char *old_cwd,
const char *new_cwd,
void *data UNUSED)
set_work_tree: use chdir_notify When we change to the top of the working tree, we manually re-adjust $GIT_DIR and call set_git_dir() again, in order to update any relative git-dir we'd compute earlier. Instead of the work-tree code having to know to call the git-dir code, let's use the new chdir_notify interface. There are two spots that need updating, with a few subtleties in each: 1. the set_git_dir() code needs to chdir_notify_register() so it can be told when to update its path. Technically we could push this down into repo_set_gitdir(), so that even repository structs besides the_repository could benefit from this. But that opens up a lot of complications: - we'd still need to touch set_git_dir(), because it does some other setup (like setting $GIT_DIR in the environment) - submodules using other repository structs get cleaned up, which means we'd need to remove them from the chdir_notify list - it's unlikely to fix any bugs, since we shouldn't generally chdir() in the middle of working on a submodule 2. setup_work_tree now needs to call chdir_notify(), and can lose its manual set_git_dir() call. Note that at first glance it looks like this undoes the absolute-to-relative optimization added by 044bbbcb63 (Make git_dir a path relative to work_tree in setup_work_tree(), 2008-06-19). But for the most part that optimization was just _undoing_ the relative-to-absolute conversion which the function was doing earlier (and which is now gone). It is true that if you already have an absolute git_dir that the setup_work_tree() function will no longer make it relative as a side effect. But: - we generally do have relative git-dir's due to the way the discovery code works - if we really care about making git-dir's relative when possible, then we should be relativizing them earlier (e.g., when we see an absolute $GIT_DIR we could turn it relative, whether we are going to chdir into a worktree or not). That would cover all cases, including ones that 044bbbcb63 did not. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
{
char *path = reparent_relative_path(old_cwd, new_cwd, get_git_dir());
struct tmp_objdir *tmp_objdir = tmp_objdir_unapply_primary_odb();
set_work_tree: use chdir_notify When we change to the top of the working tree, we manually re-adjust $GIT_DIR and call set_git_dir() again, in order to update any relative git-dir we'd compute earlier. Instead of the work-tree code having to know to call the git-dir code, let's use the new chdir_notify interface. There are two spots that need updating, with a few subtleties in each: 1. the set_git_dir() code needs to chdir_notify_register() so it can be told when to update its path. Technically we could push this down into repo_set_gitdir(), so that even repository structs besides the_repository could benefit from this. But that opens up a lot of complications: - we'd still need to touch set_git_dir(), because it does some other setup (like setting $GIT_DIR in the environment) - submodules using other repository structs get cleaned up, which means we'd need to remove them from the chdir_notify list - it's unlikely to fix any bugs, since we shouldn't generally chdir() in the middle of working on a submodule 2. setup_work_tree now needs to call chdir_notify(), and can lose its manual set_git_dir() call. Note that at first glance it looks like this undoes the absolute-to-relative optimization added by 044bbbcb63 (Make git_dir a path relative to work_tree in setup_work_tree(), 2008-06-19). But for the most part that optimization was just _undoing_ the relative-to-absolute conversion which the function was doing earlier (and which is now gone). It is true that if you already have an absolute git_dir that the setup_work_tree() function will no longer make it relative as a side effect. But: - we generally do have relative git-dir's due to the way the discovery code works - if we really care about making git-dir's relative when possible, then we should be relativizing them earlier (e.g., when we see an absolute $GIT_DIR we could turn it relative, whether we are going to chdir into a worktree or not). That would cover all cases, including ones that 044bbbcb63 did not. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
trace_printf_key(&trace_setup_key,
"setup: move $GIT_DIR to '%s'",
path);
set_git_dir_1(path);
if (tmp_objdir)
tmp_objdir_reapply_primary_odb(tmp_objdir, old_cwd, new_cwd);