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git/attr.c

1181 lines
29 KiB

/*
* Handle git attributes. See gitattributes(5) for a description of
* the file syntax, and attr.h for a description of the API.
*
* One basic design decision here is that we are not going to support
* an insanely large number of attributes.
*/
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
#include "cache.h"
#include "config.h"
#include "exec-cmd.h"
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
#include "attr.h"
#include "dir.h"
#include "utf8.h"
#include "quote.h"
#include "thread-utils.h"
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
const char git_attr__true[] = "(builtin)true";
const char git_attr__false[] = "\0(builtin)false";
static const char git_attr__unknown[] = "(builtin)unknown";
#define ATTR__TRUE git_attr__true
#define ATTR__FALSE git_attr__false
#define ATTR__UNSET NULL
#define ATTR__UNKNOWN git_attr__unknown
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
#ifndef DEBUG_ATTR
#define DEBUG_ATTR 0
#endif
struct git_attr {
int attr_nr; /* unique attribute number */
char name[FLEX_ARRAY]; /* attribute name */
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
};
const char *git_attr_name(const struct git_attr *attr)
{
return attr->name;
}
struct attr_hashmap {
struct hashmap map;
pthread_mutex_t mutex;
};
static inline void hashmap_lock(struct attr_hashmap *map)
{
pthread_mutex_lock(&map->mutex);
}
static inline void hashmap_unlock(struct attr_hashmap *map)
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
{
pthread_mutex_unlock(&map->mutex);
}
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
/* The container for objects stored in "struct attr_hashmap" */
struct attr_hash_entry {
struct hashmap_entry ent;
const char *key; /* the key; memory should be owned by value */
size_t keylen; /* length of the key */
void *value; /* the stored value */
};
/* attr_hashmap comparison function */
static int attr_hash_entry_cmp(const void *cmp_data UNUSED,
const struct hashmap_entry *eptr,
const struct hashmap_entry *entry_or_key,
const void *keydata UNUSED)
{
const struct attr_hash_entry *a, *b;
a = container_of(eptr, const struct attr_hash_entry, ent);
b = container_of(entry_or_key, const struct attr_hash_entry, ent);
return (a->keylen != b->keylen) || strncmp(a->key, b->key, a->keylen);
}
/*
* The global dictionary of all interned attributes. This
* is a singleton object which is shared between threads.
* Access to this dictionary must be surrounded with a mutex.
*/
static struct attr_hashmap g_attr_hashmap = {
.map = HASHMAP_INIT(attr_hash_entry_cmp, NULL),
};
/*
* Retrieve the 'value' stored in a hashmap given the provided 'key'.
* If there is no matching entry, return NULL.
*/
static void *attr_hashmap_get(struct attr_hashmap *map,
const char *key, size_t keylen)
{
struct attr_hash_entry k;
struct attr_hash_entry *e;
hashmap_entry_init(&k.ent, memhash(key, keylen));
k.key = key;
k.keylen = keylen;
e = hashmap_get_entry(&map->map, &k, ent, NULL);
return e ? e->value : NULL;
}
/* Add 'value' to a hashmap based on the provided 'key'. */
static void attr_hashmap_add(struct attr_hashmap *map,
const char *key, size_t keylen,
void *value)
{
struct attr_hash_entry *e;
e = xmalloc(sizeof(struct attr_hash_entry));
hashmap_entry_init(&e->ent, memhash(key, keylen));
e->key = key;
e->keylen = keylen;
e->value = value;
hashmap_add(&map->map, &e->ent);
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
}
struct all_attrs_item {
const struct git_attr *attr;
const char *value;
/*
* If 'macro' is non-NULL, indicates that 'attr' is a macro based on
* the current attribute stack and contains a pointer to the match_attr
* definition of the macro
*/
const struct match_attr *macro;
};
/*
* Reallocate and reinitialize the array of all attributes (which is used in
* the attribute collection process) in 'check' based on the global dictionary
* of attributes.
*/
static void all_attrs_init(struct attr_hashmap *map, struct attr_check *check)
{
int i;
hashmap: add API to disable item counting when threaded This is to address concerns raised by ThreadSanitizer on the mailing list about threaded unprotected R/W access to map.size with my previous "disallow rehash" change (0607e10009ee4e37cb49b4cec8d28a9dda1656a4). See: https://public-inbox.org/git/adb37b70139fd1e2bac18bfd22c8b96683ae18eb.1502780344.git.martin.agren@gmail.com/ Add API to hashmap to disable item counting and thus automatic rehashing. Also include API to later re-enable them. When item counting is disabled, the map.size field is invalid. So to prevent accidents, the field has been renamed and an accessor function hashmap_get_size() has been added. All direct references to this field have been been updated. And the name of the field changed to map.private_size to communicate this. Here is the relevant output from ThreadSanitizer showing the problem: WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=10554) Read of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T2 (mutexes: write M16): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #5 <null> <null> Previous write of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T1 (mutexes: write M31): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:380 #5 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #6 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #7 <null> <null> Martin gives instructions for running TSan on test t3008 in this post: https://public-inbox.org/git/CAN0heSoJDL9pWELD6ciLTmWf-a=oyxe4EXXOmCKvsG5MSuzxsA@mail.gmail.com/ Signed-off-by: Jeff Hostetler <jeffhost@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
unsigned int size;
hashmap_lock(map);
hashmap: add API to disable item counting when threaded This is to address concerns raised by ThreadSanitizer on the mailing list about threaded unprotected R/W access to map.size with my previous "disallow rehash" change (0607e10009ee4e37cb49b4cec8d28a9dda1656a4). See: https://public-inbox.org/git/adb37b70139fd1e2bac18bfd22c8b96683ae18eb.1502780344.git.martin.agren@gmail.com/ Add API to hashmap to disable item counting and thus automatic rehashing. Also include API to later re-enable them. When item counting is disabled, the map.size field is invalid. So to prevent accidents, the field has been renamed and an accessor function hashmap_get_size() has been added. All direct references to this field have been been updated. And the name of the field changed to map.private_size to communicate this. Here is the relevant output from ThreadSanitizer showing the problem: WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=10554) Read of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T2 (mutexes: write M16): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #5 <null> <null> Previous write of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T1 (mutexes: write M31): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:380 #5 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #6 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #7 <null> <null> Martin gives instructions for running TSan on test t3008 in this post: https://public-inbox.org/git/CAN0heSoJDL9pWELD6ciLTmWf-a=oyxe4EXXOmCKvsG5MSuzxsA@mail.gmail.com/ Signed-off-by: Jeff Hostetler <jeffhost@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
size = hashmap_get_size(&map->map);
if (size < check->all_attrs_nr)
BUG("interned attributes shouldn't be deleted");
/*
* If the number of attributes in the global dictionary has increased
* (or this attr_check instance doesn't have an initialized all_attrs
* field), reallocate the provided attr_check instance's all_attrs
* field and fill each entry with its corresponding git_attr.
*/
hashmap: add API to disable item counting when threaded This is to address concerns raised by ThreadSanitizer on the mailing list about threaded unprotected R/W access to map.size with my previous "disallow rehash" change (0607e10009ee4e37cb49b4cec8d28a9dda1656a4). See: https://public-inbox.org/git/adb37b70139fd1e2bac18bfd22c8b96683ae18eb.1502780344.git.martin.agren@gmail.com/ Add API to hashmap to disable item counting and thus automatic rehashing. Also include API to later re-enable them. When item counting is disabled, the map.size field is invalid. So to prevent accidents, the field has been renamed and an accessor function hashmap_get_size() has been added. All direct references to this field have been been updated. And the name of the field changed to map.private_size to communicate this. Here is the relevant output from ThreadSanitizer showing the problem: WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=10554) Read of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T2 (mutexes: write M16): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #5 <null> <null> Previous write of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T1 (mutexes: write M31): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:380 #5 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #6 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #7 <null> <null> Martin gives instructions for running TSan on test t3008 in this post: https://public-inbox.org/git/CAN0heSoJDL9pWELD6ciLTmWf-a=oyxe4EXXOmCKvsG5MSuzxsA@mail.gmail.com/ Signed-off-by: Jeff Hostetler <jeffhost@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
if (size != check->all_attrs_nr) {
struct attr_hash_entry *e;
struct hashmap_iter iter;
hashmap: add API to disable item counting when threaded This is to address concerns raised by ThreadSanitizer on the mailing list about threaded unprotected R/W access to map.size with my previous "disallow rehash" change (0607e10009ee4e37cb49b4cec8d28a9dda1656a4). See: https://public-inbox.org/git/adb37b70139fd1e2bac18bfd22c8b96683ae18eb.1502780344.git.martin.agren@gmail.com/ Add API to hashmap to disable item counting and thus automatic rehashing. Also include API to later re-enable them. When item counting is disabled, the map.size field is invalid. So to prevent accidents, the field has been renamed and an accessor function hashmap_get_size() has been added. All direct references to this field have been been updated. And the name of the field changed to map.private_size to communicate this. Here is the relevant output from ThreadSanitizer showing the problem: WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=10554) Read of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T2 (mutexes: write M16): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #5 <null> <null> Previous write of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T1 (mutexes: write M31): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:380 #5 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #6 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #7 <null> <null> Martin gives instructions for running TSan on test t3008 in this post: https://public-inbox.org/git/CAN0heSoJDL9pWELD6ciLTmWf-a=oyxe4EXXOmCKvsG5MSuzxsA@mail.gmail.com/ Signed-off-by: Jeff Hostetler <jeffhost@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
REALLOC_ARRAY(check->all_attrs, size);
check->all_attrs_nr = size;
hashmap_for_each_entry(&map->map, &iter, e,
ent /* member name */) {
const struct git_attr *a = e->value;
check->all_attrs[a->attr_nr].attr = a;
}
}
hashmap_unlock(map);
/*
* Re-initialize every entry in check->all_attrs.
* This re-initialization can live outside of the locked region since
* the attribute dictionary is no longer being accessed.
*/
for (i = 0; i < check->all_attrs_nr; i++) {
check->all_attrs[i].value = ATTR__UNKNOWN;
check->all_attrs[i].macro = NULL;
}
}
static int attr_name_valid(const char *name, size_t namelen)
{
/*
* Attribute name cannot begin with '-' and must consist of
* characters from [-A-Za-z0-9_.].
*/
if (namelen <= 0 || *name == '-')
return 0;
while (namelen--) {
char ch = *name++;
if (! (ch == '-' || ch == '.' || ch == '_' ||
('0' <= ch && ch <= '9') ||
('a' <= ch && ch <= 'z') ||
('A' <= ch && ch <= 'Z')) )
return 0;
}
return 1;
}
static void report_invalid_attr(const char *name, size_t len,
const char *src, int lineno)
{
struct strbuf err = STRBUF_INIT;
strbuf_addf(&err, _("%.*s is not a valid attribute name"),
(int) len, name);
fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s:%d\n", err.buf, src, lineno);
strbuf_release(&err);
}
/*
* Given a 'name', lookup and return the corresponding attribute in the global
* dictionary. If no entry is found, create a new attribute and store it in
* the dictionary.
*/
static const struct git_attr *git_attr_internal(const char *name, int namelen)
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
{
struct git_attr *a;
if (!attr_name_valid(name, namelen))
return NULL;
hashmap_lock(&g_attr_hashmap);
a = attr_hashmap_get(&g_attr_hashmap, name, namelen);
if (!a) {
FLEX_ALLOC_MEM(a, name, name, namelen);
hashmap: add API to disable item counting when threaded This is to address concerns raised by ThreadSanitizer on the mailing list about threaded unprotected R/W access to map.size with my previous "disallow rehash" change (0607e10009ee4e37cb49b4cec8d28a9dda1656a4). See: https://public-inbox.org/git/adb37b70139fd1e2bac18bfd22c8b96683ae18eb.1502780344.git.martin.agren@gmail.com/ Add API to hashmap to disable item counting and thus automatic rehashing. Also include API to later re-enable them. When item counting is disabled, the map.size field is invalid. So to prevent accidents, the field has been renamed and an accessor function hashmap_get_size() has been added. All direct references to this field have been been updated. And the name of the field changed to map.private_size to communicate this. Here is the relevant output from ThreadSanitizer showing the problem: WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=10554) Read of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T2 (mutexes: write M16): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #5 <null> <null> Previous write of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T1 (mutexes: write M31): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:380 #5 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #6 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #7 <null> <null> Martin gives instructions for running TSan on test t3008 in this post: https://public-inbox.org/git/CAN0heSoJDL9pWELD6ciLTmWf-a=oyxe4EXXOmCKvsG5MSuzxsA@mail.gmail.com/ Signed-off-by: Jeff Hostetler <jeffhost@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
a->attr_nr = hashmap_get_size(&g_attr_hashmap.map);
attr_hashmap_add(&g_attr_hashmap, a->name, namelen, a);
hashmap: add API to disable item counting when threaded This is to address concerns raised by ThreadSanitizer on the mailing list about threaded unprotected R/W access to map.size with my previous "disallow rehash" change (0607e10009ee4e37cb49b4cec8d28a9dda1656a4). See: https://public-inbox.org/git/adb37b70139fd1e2bac18bfd22c8b96683ae18eb.1502780344.git.martin.agren@gmail.com/ Add API to hashmap to disable item counting and thus automatic rehashing. Also include API to later re-enable them. When item counting is disabled, the map.size field is invalid. So to prevent accidents, the field has been renamed and an accessor function hashmap_get_size() has been added. All direct references to this field have been been updated. And the name of the field changed to map.private_size to communicate this. Here is the relevant output from ThreadSanitizer showing the problem: WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=10554) Read of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T2 (mutexes: write M16): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #5 <null> <null> Previous write of size 4 at 0x00000082d488 by thread T1 (mutexes: write M31): #0 hashmap_add hashmap.c:209 #1 hash_dir_entry_with_parent_and_prefix name-hash.c:302 #2 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:347 #3 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #4 handle_range_dir name-hash.c:380 #5 handle_range_1 name-hash.c:415 #6 lazy_dir_thread_proc name-hash.c:471 #7 <null> <null> Martin gives instructions for running TSan on test t3008 in this post: https://public-inbox.org/git/CAN0heSoJDL9pWELD6ciLTmWf-a=oyxe4EXXOmCKvsG5MSuzxsA@mail.gmail.com/ Signed-off-by: Jeff Hostetler <jeffhost@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
assert(a->attr_nr ==
(hashmap_get_size(&g_attr_hashmap.map) - 1));
}
hashmap_unlock(&g_attr_hashmap);
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
return a;
}
const struct git_attr *git_attr(const char *name)
{
return git_attr_internal(name, strlen(name));
}
/* What does a matched pattern decide? */
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
struct attr_state {
const struct git_attr *attr;
const char *setto;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
};
struct pattern {
const char *pattern;
int patternlen;
int nowildcardlen;
unsigned flags; /* PATTERN_FLAG_* */
};
/*
* One rule, as from a .gitattributes file.
*
* If is_macro is true, then u.attr is a pointer to the git_attr being
* defined.
*
* If is_macro is false, then u.pat is the filename pattern to which the
* rule applies.
*
* In either case, num_attr is the number of attributes affected by
* this rule, and state is an array listing them. The attributes are
* listed as they appear in the file (macros unexpanded).
*/
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
struct match_attr {
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
union {
struct pattern pat;
const struct git_attr *attr;
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
} u;
char is_macro;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
unsigned num_attr;
struct attr_state state[FLEX_ARRAY];
};
static const char blank[] = " \t\r\n";
/* Flags usable in read_attr() and parse_attr_line() family of functions. */
#define READ_ATTR_MACRO_OK (1<<0)
attr: do not respect symlinks for in-tree .gitattributes The attributes system may sometimes read in-tree files from the filesystem, and sometimes from the index. In the latter case, we do not resolve symbolic links (and are not likely to ever start doing so). Let's open filesystem links with O_NOFOLLOW so that the two cases behave consistently. As a bonus, this means that git will not follow such symlinks to read and parse out-of-tree paths. In some cases this could have security implications, as a malicious repository can cause Git to open and read arbitrary files. It could already feed arbitrary content to the parser, but in certain setups it might be able to exfiltrate data from those paths (e.g., if an automated service operating on the malicious repo reveals its stderr to an attacker). Note that O_NOFOLLOW only prevents following links for the path itself, not intermediate directories in the path. At first glance, it seems like ln -s /some/path in-repo might still look at "in-repo/.gitattributes", following the symlink to "/some/path/.gitattributes". However, if "in-repo" is a symbolic link, then we know that it has no git paths below it, and will never look at its .gitattributes file. We will continue to support out-of-tree symbolic links (e.g., in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes); this just affects in-tree links. When a symbolic link is encountered, the contents are ignored and a warning is printed. POSIX specifies ELOOP in this case, so the user would generally see something like: warning: unable to access '.gitattributes': Too many levels of symbolic links Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
2 years ago
#define READ_ATTR_NOFOLLOW (1<<1)
/*
* Parse a whitespace-delimited attribute state (i.e., "attr",
* "-attr", "!attr", or "attr=value") from the string starting at src.
* If e is not NULL, write the results to *e. Return a pointer to the
* remainder of the string (with leading whitespace removed), or NULL
* if there was an error.
*/
static const char *parse_attr(const char *src, int lineno, const char *cp,
struct attr_state *e)
{
const char *ep, *equals;
int len;
ep = cp + strcspn(cp, blank);
equals = strchr(cp, '=');
if (equals && ep < equals)
equals = NULL;
if (equals)
len = equals - cp;
else
len = ep - cp;
if (!e) {
if (*cp == '-' || *cp == '!') {
cp++;
len--;
}
if (!attr_name_valid(cp, len)) {
report_invalid_attr(cp, len, src, lineno);
return NULL;
}
} else {
/*
* As this function is always called twice, once with
* e == NULL in the first pass and then e != NULL in
* the second pass, no need for attr_name_valid()
* check here.
*/
if (*cp == '-' || *cp == '!') {
e->setto = (*cp == '-') ? ATTR__FALSE : ATTR__UNSET;
cp++;
len--;
}
else if (!equals)
e->setto = ATTR__TRUE;
else {
e->setto = xmemdupz(equals + 1, ep - equals - 1);
}
e->attr = git_attr_internal(cp, len);
}
return ep + strspn(ep, blank);
}
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
static struct match_attr *parse_attr_line(const char *line, const char *src,
int lineno, unsigned flags)
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
{
int namelen;
int num_attr, i;
const char *cp, *name, *states;
struct match_attr *res = NULL;
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
int is_macro;
struct strbuf pattern = STRBUF_INIT;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
cp = line + strspn(line, blank);
if (!*cp || *cp == '#')
return NULL;
name = cp;
if (*cp == '"' && !unquote_c_style(&pattern, name, &states)) {
name = pattern.buf;
namelen = pattern.len;
} else {
namelen = strcspn(name, blank);
states = name + namelen;
}
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
if (strlen(ATTRIBUTE_MACRO_PREFIX) < namelen &&
starts_with(name, ATTRIBUTE_MACRO_PREFIX)) {
if (!(flags & READ_ATTR_MACRO_OK)) {
fprintf_ln(stderr, _("%s not allowed: %s:%d"),
name, src, lineno);
goto fail_return;
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
}
is_macro = 1;
name += strlen(ATTRIBUTE_MACRO_PREFIX);
name += strspn(name, blank);
namelen = strcspn(name, blank);
if (!attr_name_valid(name, namelen)) {
report_invalid_attr(name, namelen, src, lineno);
goto fail_return;
}
attribute macro support This adds "attribute macros" (for lack of better name). So far, we have low-level attributes such as crlf and diff, which are defined in operational terms --- setting or unsetting them on a particular path directly affects what is done to the path. For example, in order to decline diffs or crlf conversions on a binary blob, no diffs on PostScript files, and treat all other files normally, you would have something like these: * diff crlf *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf That is fine as the operation goes, but gets unwieldy rather rapidly, when we start adding more low-level attributes that are defined in operational terms. A near-term example of such an attribute would be 'merge-3way' which would control if git should attempt the usual 3-way file-level merge internally, or leave merging to a specialized external program of user's choice. When it is added, we do _not_ want to force the users to update the above to: * diff crlf merge-3way *.ps !diff proprietary.o !diff !crlf !merge-3way The way this patch solves this issue is to realize that the attributes the user is assigning to paths are not defined in terms of operations but in terms of what they are. All of the three low-level attributes usually make sense for most of the files that sane SCM users have git operate on (these files are typically called "text'). Only a few cases, such as binary blob, need exception to decline the "usual treatment given to text files" -- and people mark them as "binary". So this allows the $GIT_DIR/info/alternates and .gitattributes at the toplevel of the project to also specify attributes that assigns other attributes. The syntax is '[attr]' followed by an attribute name followed by a list of attribute names: [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way When "binary" attribute is set to a path, if the path has not got diff/crlf/merge-3way attribute set or unset by other rules, this rule unsets the three low-level attributes. It is expected that the user level .gitattributes will be expressed mostly in terms of attributes based on what the files are, and the above sample would become like this: (built-in attribute configuration) [attr] binary !diff !crlf !merge-3way * diff crlf merge-3way (project specific .gitattributes) proprietary.o binary (user preference $GIT_DIR/info/attributes) *.ps !diff There are a few caveats. * As described above, you can define these macros only in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes and toplevel .gitattributes. * There is no attempt to detect circular definition of macro attributes, and definitions are evaluated from bottom to top as usual to fill in other attributes that have not yet got values. The following would work as expected: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.ps ps while this would most likely not (I haven't tried): [attr] ps text !diff [attr] text diff crlf *.ps ps * When a macro says "[attr] A B !C", saying that a path does not have attribute A does not let you tell anything about attributes B or C. That is, given this: [attr] text diff crlf [attr] ps text !diff *.txt !ps path hello.txt, which would match "*.txt" pattern, would have "ps" attribute set to zero, but that does not make text attribute of hello.txt set to false (nor diff attribute set to true). Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
}
else
is_macro = 0;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
states += strspn(states, blank);
/* First pass to count the attr_states */
for (cp = states, num_attr = 0; *cp; num_attr++) {
cp = parse_attr(src, lineno, cp, NULL);
if (!cp)
goto fail_return;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
}
res = xcalloc(1,
sizeof(*res) +
sizeof(struct attr_state) * num_attr +
(is_macro ? 0 : namelen + 1));
if (is_macro) {
res->u.attr = git_attr_internal(name, namelen);
} else {
char *p = (char *)&(res->state[num_attr]);
memcpy(p, name, namelen);
res->u.pat.pattern = p;
treewide: rename 'exclude' methods to 'pattern' The first consumer of pattern-matching filenames was the .gitignore feature. In that context, storing a list of patterns as a 'struct exclude_list' makes sense. However, the sparse-checkout feature then adopted these structures and methods, but with the opposite meaning: these patterns match the files that should be included! It would be clearer to rename this entire library as a "pattern matching" library, and the callers apply exclusion/inclusion logic accordingly based on their needs. This commit renames several methods defined in dir.h to make more sense with the renamed 'struct exclude_list' to 'struct pattern_list' and 'struct exclude' to 'struct path_pattern': * last_exclude_matching() -> last_matching_pattern() * parse_exclude() -> parse_path_pattern() In addition, the word 'exclude' was replaced with 'pattern' in the methods below: * add_exclude_list() * add_excludes_from_file_to_list() * add_excludes_from_file() * add_excludes_from_blob_to_list() * add_exclude() * clear_exclude_list() A few methods with the word "exclude" remain. These will be handled seperately. In particular, the method "is_excluded()" is concretely about the .gitignore file relative to a specific directory. This is the important boundary between library and consumer: is_excluded() cares about .gitignore, but is_excluded() calls last_matching_pattern() to make that decision. Signed-off-by: Derrick Stolee <dstolee@microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
3 years ago
parse_path_pattern(&res->u.pat.pattern,
&res->u.pat.patternlen,
&res->u.pat.flags,
&res->u.pat.nowildcardlen);
if (res->u.pat.flags & PATTERN_FLAG_NEGATIVE) {
warning(_("Negative patterns are ignored in git attributes\n"
"Use '\\!' for literal leading exclamation."));
goto fail_return;
}
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
}
res->is_macro = is_macro;
res->num_attr = num_attr;
/* Second pass to fill the attr_states */
for (cp = states, i = 0; *cp; i++) {
cp = parse_attr(src, lineno, cp, &(res->state[i]));
}
strbuf_release(&pattern);
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
return res;
fail_return:
strbuf_release(&pattern);
free(res);
return NULL;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
}
/*
* Like info/exclude and .gitignore, the attribute information can
* come from many places.
*
* (1) .gitattributes file of the same directory;
* (2) .gitattributes file of the parent directory if (1) does not have
* any match; this goes recursively upwards, just like .gitignore.
* (3) $GIT_DIR/info/attributes, which overrides both of the above.
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
*
* In the same file, later entries override the earlier match, so in the
* global list, we would have entries from info/attributes the earliest
* (reading the file from top to bottom), .gitattributes of the root
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
* directory (again, reading the file from top to bottom) down to the
* current directory, and then scan the list backwards to find the first match.
* This is exactly the same as what is_excluded() does in dir.c to deal with
* .gitignore file and info/excludes file as a fallback.
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
*/
struct attr_stack {
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
struct attr_stack *prev;
char *origin;
size_t originlen;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
unsigned num_matches;
unsigned alloc;
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
struct match_attr **attrs;
};
Add basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths This adds the basic infrastructure to assign attributes to paths, in a way similar to what the exclusion mechanism does based on $GIT_DIR/info/exclude and .gitignore files. An attribute is just a simple string that does not contain any whitespace. They can be specified in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file, and .gitattributes file in each directory. Each line in these files defines a pattern matching rule. Similar to the exclusion mechanism, a later match overrides an earlier match in the same file, and entries from .gitattributes file in the same directory takes precedence over the ones from parent directories. Lines in $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file are used as the lowest precedence default rules. A line is either a comment (an empty line, or a line that begins with a '#'), or a rule, which is a whitespace separated list of tokens. The first token on the line is a shell glob pattern. The rest are names of attributes, each of which can optionally be prefixed with '!'. Such a line means "if a path matches this glob, this attribute is set (or unset -- if the attribute name is prefixed with '!'). For glob matching, the same "if the pattern does not have a slash in it, the basename of the path is matched with fnmatch(3) against the pattern, otherwise, the path is matched with the pattern with FNM_PATHNAME" rule as the exclusion mechanism is used. This does not define what an attribute means. Tying an attribute to various effects it has on git operation for paths that have it will be specified separately. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
16 years ago
static void attr_stack_free(struct attr_stack *e)