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git/INSTALL

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Git installation
Normally you can just do "make" followed by "make install", and that
will install the git programs in your own ~/bin/ directory. If you want
to do a global install, you can do
$ make prefix=/usr all doc info ;# as yourself
# make prefix=/usr install install-doc install-html install-info ;# as root
(or prefix=/usr/local, of course). Just like any program suite
that uses $prefix, the built results have some paths encoded,
which are derived from $prefix, so "make all; make prefix=/usr
install" would not work.
The beginning of the Makefile documents many variables that affect the way
git is built. You can override them either from the command line, or in a
config.mak file.
Alternatively you can use autoconf generated ./configure script to
set up install paths (via config.mak.autogen), so you can write instead
$ make configure ;# as yourself
$ ./configure --prefix=/usr ;# as yourself
$ make all doc ;# as yourself
# make install install-doc install-html;# as root
If you're willing to trade off (much) longer build time for a later
faster git you can also do a profile feedback build with
$ make prefix=/usr profile
Fix build problems related to profile-directed optimization There was a number of problems I ran into when trying the profile-directed optimizations added by Andi Kleen in git commit 7ddc2710b9. (This was using gcc 4.4 found on many enterprise distros.) 1) The -fprofile-generate and -fprofile-use commands are incompatible with ccache; the code ends up looking in the wrong place for the gcda files based on the ccache object names. 2) If the makefile notices that CFLAGS are different, it will rebuild all of the binaries. Hence the recipe originally specified by the INSTALL file ("make profile-all" followed by "make install") doesn't work. It will appear to work, but the binaries will end up getting built with no optimization. This patch fixes this by using an explicit set of options passed via the PROFILE variable then using this to directly manipulate CFLAGS and EXTLIBS. The developer can run "make PROFILE=BUILD all ; sudo make PROFILE=BUILD install" automatically run a two-pass build with the test suite run in between as the sample workload for the purpose of recording profiling information to do the profile-directed optimization. Alternatively, the profiling version of binaries can be built using: make PROFILE=GEN PROFILE_DIR=/var/cache/profile all make PROFILE=GEN install and then after git has been used for a while, the optimized version of the binary can be built as follows: make PROFILE=USE PROFILE_DIR=/var/cache/profile all make PROFILE=USE install Signed-off-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
# make prefix=/usr PROFILE=BUILD install
This will run the complete test suite as training workload and then
rebuild git with the generated profile feedback. This results in a git
which is a few percent faster on CPU intensive workloads. This
may be a good tradeoff for distribution packagers.
Alternatively you can run profile feedback only with the git benchmark
suite. This runs significantly faster than the full test suite, but
has less coverage:
$ make prefix=/usr profile-fast
# make prefix=/usr PROFILE=BUILD install
Fix build problems related to profile-directed optimization There was a number of problems I ran into when trying the profile-directed optimizations added by Andi Kleen in git commit 7ddc2710b9. (This was using gcc 4.4 found on many enterprise distros.) 1) The -fprofile-generate and -fprofile-use commands are incompatible with ccache; the code ends up looking in the wrong place for the gcda files based on the ccache object names. 2) If the makefile notices that CFLAGS are different, it will rebuild all of the binaries. Hence the recipe originally specified by the INSTALL file ("make profile-all" followed by "make install") doesn't work. It will appear to work, but the binaries will end up getting built with no optimization. This patch fixes this by using an explicit set of options passed via the PROFILE variable then using this to directly manipulate CFLAGS and EXTLIBS. The developer can run "make PROFILE=BUILD all ; sudo make PROFILE=BUILD install" automatically run a two-pass build with the test suite run in between as the sample workload for the purpose of recording profiling information to do the profile-directed optimization. Alternatively, the profiling version of binaries can be built using: make PROFILE=GEN PROFILE_DIR=/var/cache/profile all make PROFILE=GEN install and then after git has been used for a while, the optimized version of the binary can be built as follows: make PROFILE=USE PROFILE_DIR=/var/cache/profile all make PROFILE=USE install Signed-off-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
Or if you just want to install a profile-optimized version of git into
your home directory, you could run:
$ make profile-install
or
$ make profile-fast-install
Fix build problems related to profile-directed optimization There was a number of problems I ran into when trying the profile-directed optimizations added by Andi Kleen in git commit 7ddc2710b9. (This was using gcc 4.4 found on many enterprise distros.) 1) The -fprofile-generate and -fprofile-use commands are incompatible with ccache; the code ends up looking in the wrong place for the gcda files based on the ccache object names. 2) If the makefile notices that CFLAGS are different, it will rebuild all of the binaries. Hence the recipe originally specified by the INSTALL file ("make profile-all" followed by "make install") doesn't work. It will appear to work, but the binaries will end up getting built with no optimization. This patch fixes this by using an explicit set of options passed via the PROFILE variable then using this to directly manipulate CFLAGS and EXTLIBS. The developer can run "make PROFILE=BUILD all ; sudo make PROFILE=BUILD install" automatically run a two-pass build with the test suite run in between as the sample workload for the purpose of recording profiling information to do the profile-directed optimization. Alternatively, the profiling version of binaries can be built using: make PROFILE=GEN PROFILE_DIR=/var/cache/profile all make PROFILE=GEN install and then after git has been used for a while, the optimized version of the binary can be built as follows: make PROFILE=USE PROFILE_DIR=/var/cache/profile all make PROFILE=USE install Signed-off-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
As a caveat: a profile-optimized build takes a *lot* longer since the
git tree must be built twice, and in order for the profiling
measurements to work properly, ccache must be disabled and the test
suite has to be run using only a single CPU. In addition, the profile
feedback build stage currently generates a lot of additional compiler
warnings.
Issues of note:
- Ancient versions of GNU Interactive Tools (pre-4.9.2) installed a
program "git", whose name conflicts with this program. But with
version 4.9.2, after long hiatus without active maintenance (since
around 1997), it changed its name to gnuit and the name conflict is no
longer a problem.
NOTE: When compiled with backward compatibility option, the GNU
Interactive Tools package still can install "git", but you can build it
with --disable-transition option to avoid this.
- You can use git after building but without installing if you want
to test drive it. Simply run git found in bin-wrappers directory
in the build directory, or prepend that directory to your $PATH.
This however is less efficient than running an installed git, as
you always need an extra fork+exec to run any git subcommand.
It is still possible to use git without installing by setting a few
environment variables, which was the way this was done
traditionally. But using git found in bin-wrappers directory in
the build directory is far simpler. As a historical reference, the
old way went like this:
GIT_EXEC_PATH=`pwd`
PATH=`pwd`:$PATH
Makefile: replace perl/Makefile.PL with simple make rules Replace the perl/Makefile.PL and the fallback perl/Makefile used under NO_PERL_MAKEMAKER=NoThanks with a much simpler implementation heavily inspired by how the i18n infrastructure's build process works[1]. The reason for having the Makefile.PL in the first place is that it was initially[2] building a perl C binding to interface with libgit, this functionality, that was removed[3] before Git.pm ever made it to the master branch. We've since since started maintaining a fallback perl/Makefile, as MakeMaker wouldn't work on some platforms[4]. That's just the tip of the iceberg. We have the PM.stamp hack in the top-level Makefile[5] to detect whether we need to regenerate the perl/perl.mak, which I fixed just recently to deal with issues like the perl version changing from under us[6]. There is absolutely no reason for why this needs to be so complex anymore. All we're getting out of this elaborate Rube Goldberg machine was copying perl/* to perl/blib/* as we do a string-replacement on the *.pm files to hardcode @@LOCALEDIR@@ in the source, as well as pod2man-ing Git.pm & friends. So replace the whole thing with something that's pretty much a copy of how we generate po/build/**.mo from po/*.po, just with a small sed(1) command instead of msgfmt. As that's being done rename the files from *.pm to *.pmc just to indicate that they're generated (see "perldoc -f require"). While I'm at it, change the fallback for Error.pm from being something where we'll ship our own Error.pm if one doesn't exist at build time to one where we just use a Git::Error wrapper that'll always prefer the system-wide Error.pm, only falling back to our own copy if it really doesn't exist at runtime. It's now shipped as Git::FromCPAN::Error, making it easy to add other modules to Git::FromCPAN::* in the future if that's needed. Functional changes: * This will not always install into perl's idea of its global "installsitelib". This only potentially matters for packagers that need to expose Git.pm for non-git use, and as explained in the INSTALL file there's a trivial workaround. * The scripts themselves will 'use lib' the target directory, but if INSTLIBDIR is set it overrides it. It doesn't have to be this way, it could be set in addition to INSTLIBDIR, but my reading of [7] is that this is the desired behavior. * We don't build man pages for all of the perl modules as we used to, only Git(3pm). As discussed on-list[8] that we were building installed manpages for purely internal APIs like Git::I18N or private-Error.pm was always a bug anyway, and all the Git::SVN::* ones say they're internal APIs. There are apparently external users of Git.pm, but I don't expect there to be any of the others. As a side-effect of these general changes the perl documentation now only installed by install-{doc,man}, not a mere "install" as before. 1. 5e9637c629 ("i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext", 2011-11-18) 2. b1edc53d06 ("Introduce Git.pm (v4)", 2006-06-24) 3. 18b0fc1ce1 ("Git.pm: Kill Git.xs for now", 2006-09-23) 4. f848718a69 ("Make perl/ build procedure ActiveState friendly.", 2006-12-04) 5. ee9be06770 ("perl: detect new files in MakeMaker builds", 2012-07-27) 6. c59c4939c2 ("perl: regenerate perl.mak if perl -V changes", 2017-03-29) 7. 0386dd37b1 ("Makefile: add PERLLIB_EXTRA variable that adds to default perl path", 2013-11-15) 8. 87bmjjv1pu.fsf@evledraar.booking.com ("Re: [PATCH] Makefile: replace perl/Makefile.PL with simple make rules" Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
GITPERLLIB=`pwd`/perl/build/lib
export GIT_EXEC_PATH PATH GITPERLLIB
Makefile: replace perl/Makefile.PL with simple make rules Replace the perl/Makefile.PL and the fallback perl/Makefile used under NO_PERL_MAKEMAKER=NoThanks with a much simpler implementation heavily inspired by how the i18n infrastructure's build process works[1]. The reason for having the Makefile.PL in the first place is that it was initially[2] building a perl C binding to interface with libgit, this functionality, that was removed[3] before Git.pm ever made it to the master branch. We've since since started maintaining a fallback perl/Makefile, as MakeMaker wouldn't work on some platforms[4]. That's just the tip of the iceberg. We have the PM.stamp hack in the top-level Makefile[5] to detect whether we need to regenerate the perl/perl.mak, which I fixed just recently to deal with issues like the perl version changing from under us[6]. There is absolutely no reason for why this needs to be so complex anymore. All we're getting out of this elaborate Rube Goldberg machine was copying perl/* to perl/blib/* as we do a string-replacement on the *.pm files to hardcode @@LOCALEDIR@@ in the source, as well as pod2man-ing Git.pm & friends. So replace the whole thing with something that's pretty much a copy of how we generate po/build/**.mo from po/*.po, just with a small sed(1) command instead of msgfmt. As that's being done rename the files from *.pm to *.pmc just to indicate that they're generated (see "perldoc -f require"). While I'm at it, change the fallback for Error.pm from being something where we'll ship our own Error.pm if one doesn't exist at build time to one where we just use a Git::Error wrapper that'll always prefer the system-wide Error.pm, only falling back to our own copy if it really doesn't exist at runtime. It's now shipped as Git::FromCPAN::Error, making it easy to add other modules to Git::FromCPAN::* in the future if that's needed. Functional changes: * This will not always install into perl's idea of its global "installsitelib". This only potentially matters for packagers that need to expose Git.pm for non-git use, and as explained in the INSTALL file there's a trivial workaround. * The scripts themselves will 'use lib' the target directory, but if INSTLIBDIR is set it overrides it. It doesn't have to be this way, it could be set in addition to INSTLIBDIR, but my reading of [7] is that this is the desired behavior. * We don't build man pages for all of the perl modules as we used to, only Git(3pm). As discussed on-list[8] that we were building installed manpages for purely internal APIs like Git::I18N or private-Error.pm was always a bug anyway, and all the Git::SVN::* ones say they're internal APIs. There are apparently external users of Git.pm, but I don't expect there to be any of the others. As a side-effect of these general changes the perl documentation now only installed by install-{doc,man}, not a mere "install" as before. 1. 5e9637c629 ("i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext", 2011-11-18) 2. b1edc53d06 ("Introduce Git.pm (v4)", 2006-06-24) 3. 18b0fc1ce1 ("Git.pm: Kill Git.xs for now", 2006-09-23) 4. f848718a69 ("Make perl/ build procedure ActiveState friendly.", 2006-12-04) 5. ee9be06770 ("perl: detect new files in MakeMaker builds", 2012-07-27) 6. c59c4939c2 ("perl: regenerate perl.mak if perl -V changes", 2017-03-29) 7. 0386dd37b1 ("Makefile: add PERLLIB_EXTRA variable that adds to default perl path", 2013-11-15) 8. 87bmjjv1pu.fsf@evledraar.booking.com ("Re: [PATCH] Makefile: replace perl/Makefile.PL with simple make rules" Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
- By default (unless NO_PERL is provided) Git will ship various perl
scripts. However, for simplicity it doesn't use the
ExtUtils::MakeMaker toolchain to decide where to place the perl
libraries. Depending on the system this can result in the perl
Makefile: replace perl/Makefile.PL with simple make rules Replace the perl/Makefile.PL and the fallback perl/Makefile used under NO_PERL_MAKEMAKER=NoThanks with a much simpler implementation heavily inspired by how the i18n infrastructure's build process works[1]. The reason for having the Makefile.PL in the first place is that it was initially[2] building a perl C binding to interface with libgit, this functionality, that was removed[3] before Git.pm ever made it to the master branch. We've since since started maintaining a fallback perl/Makefile, as MakeMaker wouldn't work on some platforms[4]. That's just the tip of the iceberg. We have the PM.stamp hack in the top-level Makefile[5] to detect whether we need to regenerate the perl/perl.mak, which I fixed just recently to deal with issues like the perl version changing from under us[6]. There is absolutely no reason for why this needs to be so complex anymore. All we're getting out of this elaborate Rube Goldberg machine was copying perl/* to perl/blib/* as we do a string-replacement on the *.pm files to hardcode @@LOCALEDIR@@ in the source, as well as pod2man-ing Git.pm & friends. So replace the whole thing with something that's pretty much a copy of how we generate po/build/**.mo from po/*.po, just with a small sed(1) command instead of msgfmt. As that's being done rename the files from *.pm to *.pmc just to indicate that they're generated (see "perldoc -f require"). While I'm at it, change the fallback for Error.pm from being something where we'll ship our own Error.pm if one doesn't exist at build time to one where we just use a Git::Error wrapper that'll always prefer the system-wide Error.pm, only falling back to our own copy if it really doesn't exist at runtime. It's now shipped as Git::FromCPAN::Error, making it easy to add other modules to Git::FromCPAN::* in the future if that's needed. Functional changes: * This will not always install into perl's idea of its global "installsitelib". This only potentially matters for packagers that need to expose Git.pm for non-git use, and as explained in the INSTALL file there's a trivial workaround. * The scripts themselves will 'use lib' the target directory, but if INSTLIBDIR is set it overrides it. It doesn't have to be this way, it could be set in addition to INSTLIBDIR, but my reading of [7] is that this is the desired behavior. * We don't build man pages for all of the perl modules as we used to, only Git(3pm). As discussed on-list[8] that we were building installed manpages for purely internal APIs like Git::I18N or private-Error.pm was always a bug anyway, and all the Git::SVN::* ones say they're internal APIs. There are apparently external users of Git.pm, but I don't expect there to be any of the others. As a side-effect of these general changes the perl documentation now only installed by install-{doc,man}, not a mere "install" as before. 1. 5e9637c629 ("i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext", 2011-11-18) 2. b1edc53d06 ("Introduce Git.pm (v4)", 2006-06-24) 3. 18b0fc1ce1 ("Git.pm: Kill Git.xs for now", 2006-09-23) 4. f848718a69 ("Make perl/ build procedure ActiveState friendly.", 2006-12-04) 5. ee9be06770 ("perl: detect new files in MakeMaker builds", 2012-07-27) 6. c59c4939c2 ("perl: regenerate perl.mak if perl -V changes", 2017-03-29) 7. 0386dd37b1 ("Makefile: add PERLLIB_EXTRA variable that adds to default perl path", 2013-11-15) 8. 87bmjjv1pu.fsf@evledraar.booking.com ("Re: [PATCH] Makefile: replace perl/Makefile.PL with simple make rules" Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
5 years ago
libraries not being where you'd like them if they're expected to be
used by things other than Git itself.
Manually supplying a perllibdir prefix should fix this, if this is
a problem you care about, e.g.:
prefix=/usr perllibdir=/usr/$(/usr/bin/perl -MConfig -wle 'print substr $Config{installsitelib}, 1 + length $Config{siteprefixexp}')
Will result in e.g. perllibdir=/usr/share/perl/5.26.1 on Debian,
perllibdir=/usr/share/perl5 (which we'd use by default) on CentOS.
- Unless NO_PERL is provided Git will ship various perl libraries it
needs. Distributors of Git will usually want to set
NO_PERL_CPAN_FALLBACKS if NO_PERL is not provided to use their own
copies of the CPAN modules Git needs.
- Git is reasonably self-sufficient, but does depend on a few external
programs and libraries. Git can be used without most of them by adding
the appropriate "NO_<LIBRARY>=YesPlease" to the make command line or
config.mak file.
- "zlib", the compression library. Git won't build without it.
- "ssh" is used to push and pull over the net.
- A POSIX-compliant shell is required to run some scripts needed
for everyday use (e.g. "bisect", "request-pull").
- "Perl" version 5.8 or later is needed to use some of the
features (e.g. preparing a partial commit using "git add -i/-p",
interacting with svn repositories with "git svn"). If you can
live without these, use NO_PERL. Note that recent releases of
Redhat/Fedora are reported to ship Perl binary package with some
core modules stripped away (see http://lwn.net/Articles/477234/),
so you might need to install additional packages other than Perl
itself, e.g. Digest::MD5, File::Spec, File::Temp, Net::Domain,
Net::SMTP, and Time::HiRes.
- git-imap-send needs the OpenSSL library to talk IMAP over SSL if
you are using libcurl older than 7.34.0. Otherwise you can use
NO_OPENSSL without losing git-imap-send.
By default, git uses OpenSSL for SHA1 but it will use its own
library (inspired by Mozilla's) with either NO_OPENSSL or
Makefile + hash.h: remove PPC_SHA1 implementation Remove the PPC_SHA1 implementation added in a6ef3518f9a ([PATCH] PPC assembly implementation of SHA1, 2005-04-22). When this was added Apple consumer hardware used the PPC architecture, and the implementation was intended to improve SHA-1 speed there. Since it was added we've moved to using sha1collisiondetection by default, and anyone wanting hard-rolled non-DC SHA-1 implementation can use OpenSSL's via the OPENSSL_SHA1 knob. The PPC_SHA1 originally originally targeted 32 bit PPC, and later the 64 bit PPC 970 (a.k.a. Apple PowerPC G5). See 926172c5e48 (block-sha1: improve code on large-register-set machines, 2009-08-10) for a reference about the performance on G5 (a comment in block-sha1/sha1.c being removed here). I can't get it to do anything but segfault on both the BE and LE POWER machines in the GCC compile farm[1]. Anyone who's concerned about performance on PPC these days is likely to be using the IBM POWER processors. There have been proposals to entirely remove non-sha1collisiondetection implementations from the tree[2]. I think per [3] that would be a bit overzealous. I.e. there are various set-ups git's speed is going to be more important than the relatively implausible SHA-1 collision attack, or where such attacks are entirely mitigated by other means (e.g. by incoming objects being checked with DC_SHA1). But that really doesn't apply to PPC_SHA1 in particular, which seems to have outlived its usefulness. As this gets rid of the only in-tree *.S assembly file we can remove the small bits of logic from the Makefile needed to build objects from *.S (as opposed to *.c) The code being removed here was also throwing warnings with the "-pedantic" flag, it could have been fixed as 544d93bc3b4 (block-sha1: remove use of obsolete x86 assembly, 2022-03-10) did for block-sha1/*, but as noted above let's remove it instead. 1. https://cfarm.tetaneutral.net/machines/list/ Tested on gcc{110,112,135,203}, a mixture of POWER [789] ppc64 and ppc64le. All segfault in anything needing object hashing (e.g. t/t1007-hash-object.sh) when compiled with PPC_SHA1=Y. 2. https://lore.kernel.org/git/20200223223758.120941-1-mh@glandium.org/ 3. https://lore.kernel.org/git/20200224044732.GK1018190@coredump.intra.peff.net/ Acked-by: brian m. carlson" <sandals@crustytoothpaste.net> Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
1 month ago
BLK_SHA1.
- "libcurl" library is used for fetching and pushing
repositories over http:// or https://, as well as by
git-imap-send if the curl version is >= 7.34.0. If you do
not need that functionality, use NO_CURL to build without
it.
Git requires version "7.19.4" or later of "libcurl" to build
without NO_CURL. This version requirement may be bumped in
the future.
- "expat" library; git-http-push uses it for remote lock
management over DAV. Similar to "curl" above, this is optional
(with NO_EXPAT).
- "wish", the Tcl/Tk windowing shell is used in gitk to show the
history graphically, and in git-gui. If you don't want gitk or
git-gui, you can use NO_TCLTK.
i18n: add infrastructure for translating Git with gettext Change the skeleton implementation of i18n in Git to one that can show localized strings to users for our C, Shell and Perl programs using either GNU libintl or the Solaris gettext implementation. This new internationalization support is enabled by default. If gettext isn't available, or if Git is compiled with NO_GETTEXT=YesPlease, Git falls back on its current behavior of showing interface messages in English. When using the autoconf script we'll auto-detect if the gettext libraries are installed and act appropriately. This change is somewhat large because as well as adding a C, Shell and Perl i18n interface we're adding a lot of tests for them, and for those tests to work we need a skeleton PO file to actually test translations. A minimal Icelandic translation is included for this purpose. Icelandic includes multi-byte characters which makes it easy to test various edge cases, and it's a language I happen to understand. The rest of the commit message goes into detail about various sub-parts of this commit. = Installation Gettext .mo files will be installed and looked for in the standard $(prefix)/share/locale path. GIT_TEXTDOMAINDIR can also be set to override that, but that's only intended to be used to test Git itself. = Perl Perl code that's to be localized should use the new Git::I18n module. It imports a __ function into the caller's package by default. Instead of using the high level Locale::TextDomain interface I've opted to use the low-level (equivalent to the C interface) Locale::Messages module, which Locale::TextDomain itself uses. Locale::TextDomain does a lot of redundant work we don't need, and some of it would potentially introduce bugs. It tries to set the $TEXTDOMAIN based on package of the caller, and has its own hardcoded paths where it'll search for messages. I found it easier just to completely avoid it rather than try to circumvent its behavior. In any case, this is an issue wholly internal Git::I18N. Its guts can be changed later if that's deemed necessary. See <AANLkTilYD_NyIZMyj9dHtVk-ylVBfvyxpCC7982LWnVd@mail.gmail.com> for a further elaboration on this topic. = Shell Shell code that's to be localized should use the git-sh-i18n library. It's basically just a wrapper for the system's gettext.sh. If gettext.sh isn't available we'll fall back on gettext(1) if it's available. The latter is available without the former on Solaris, which has its own non-GNU gettext implementation. We also need to emulate eval_gettext() there. If neither are present we'll use a dumb printf(1) fall-through wrapper. = About libcharset.h and langinfo.h We use libcharset to query the character set of the current locale if it's available. I.e. we'll use it instead of nl_langinfo if HAVE_LIBCHARSET_H is set. The GNU gettext manual recommends using langinfo.h's nl_langinfo(CODESET) to acquire the current character set, but on systems that have libcharset.h's locale_charset() using the latter is either saner, or the only option on those systems. GNU and Solaris have a nl_langinfo(CODESET), FreeBSD can use either, but MinGW and some others need to use libcharset.h's locale_charset() instead. =Credits This patch is based on work by Jeff Epler <jepler@unpythonic.net> who did the initial Makefile / C work, and a lot of comments from the Git mailing list, including Jonathan Nieder, Jakub Narebski, Johannes Sixt, Erik Faye-Lund, Peter Krefting, Junio C Hamano, Thomas Rast and others. [jc: squashed a small Makefile fix from Ramsay] Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason <avarab@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ramsay Jones <ramsay@ramsay1.demon.co.uk> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
11 years ago
- A gettext library is used by default for localizing Git. The
primary target is GNU libintl, but the Solaris gettext
implementation also works.
We need a gettext.h on the system for C code, gettext.sh (or
Solaris gettext(1)) for shell scripts, and libintl-perl for Perl
programs.
Set NO_GETTEXT to disable localization support and make Git only
use English. Under autoconf the configure script will do this
automatically if it can't find libintl on the system.
- Python version 2.7 or later is needed to use the git-p4 interface
to Perforce.
- Some platform specific issues are dealt with Makefile rules,
but depending on your specific installation, you may not
have all the libraries/tools needed, or you may have
necessary libraries at unusual locations. Please look at the
top of the Makefile to see what can be adjusted for your needs.
You can place local settings in config.mak and the Makefile
will include them. Note that config.mak is not distributed;
the name is reserved for local settings.
- To build and install documentation suite, you need to have
the asciidoc/xmlto toolchain. Because not many people are
inclined to install the tools, the default build target
("make all") does _not_ build them.
"make doc" builds documentation in man and html formats; there are
also "make man", "make html" and "make info". Note that "make html"
requires asciidoc, but not xmlto. "make man" (and thus make doc)
requires both.
"make install-doc" installs documentation in man format only; there
are also "make install-man", "make install-html" and "make
install-info".
Building and installing the info file additionally requires
makeinfo and docbook2X. Version 0.8.3 is known to work.
Building and installing the pdf file additionally requires
dblatex. Version >= 0.2.7 is known to work.
All formats require at least asciidoc 8.4.1. Alternatively, you can
use Asciidoctor (requires Ruby) by passing USE_ASCIIDOCTOR=YesPlease
to make. You need at least Asciidoctor version 1.5.
There are also "make quick-install-doc", "make quick-install-man"
and "make quick-install-html" which install preformatted man pages
and html documentation. To use these build targets, you need to
clone two separate git-htmldocs and git-manpages repositories next
to the clone of git itself.
The minimum supported version of docbook-xsl is 1.74.
Users attempting to build the documentation on Cygwin may need to ensure
that the /etc/xml/catalog file looks something like this:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE catalog PUBLIC
"-//OASIS//DTD Entity Resolution XML Catalog V1.0//EN"
"http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/entity/release/1.0/catalog.dtd"
>
<catalog xmlns="urn:oasis:names:tc:entity:xmlns:xml:catalog">
<rewriteURI
uriStartString = "http://docbook.sourceforge.net/release/xsl/current"
rewritePrefix = "/usr/share/sgml/docbook/xsl-stylesheets"
/>
<rewriteURI
uriStartString="http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.5"
rewritePrefix="/usr/share/sgml/docbook/xml-dtd-4.5"
/>
</catalog>
This can be achieved with the following two xmlcatalog commands:
xmlcatalog --noout \
--add rewriteURI \
http://docbook.sourceforge.net/release/xsl/current \
/usr/share/sgml/docbook/xsl-stylesheets \
/etc/xml/catalog
xmlcatalog --noout \
--add rewriteURI \
http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.5/xsl/current \
/usr/share/sgml/docbook/xml-dtd-4.5 \
/etc/xml/catalog